search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
72 Future of Retail


issue 01


is modifying the time-worn age and social class demographics that have been used in marketing for so long. ABC1s and C2Ds are still useful markers, but they are not refi ned enough to describe the shifting patterns of today’s consumers, especially when it comes to technology. Tribes are not brought together by age, gender,


geography or even income, but by being like-minded. We have identifi ed over the past year or so a number of key tribes to assist our clients: the ‘style-conscious tribe’, the ‘value tribe’, the ‘urban chic’, the ‘collaborators’, the ‘iconoclasts’ and many others. Apple, for example, will be shopped worldwide by those who are ‘style-conscious’, who are ‘iconoclasts’, and also most probably ‘early adopters’. However, within any tribe there will be sub-tribes


and there will also be members who overlap between one tribe and another. Research has revealed that 63% of shoppers welcome a mobile app personalised to navigate stores and 43% fi nd in-store location deals (where their location is tracked to trigger personalised promotions whilst shopping) positively “cool”. Some are delighted to have intelligent fi tting rooms ‘talk’ to them but would be horrifi ed by a salesperson


greeting them by name when entering a store, after receiving a signal from the consumer’s mobile phone. In fact, an overwhelming 73% found the thought of that service ‘creepy’. In addition, 68% of UK shoppers fi nd facial recognition unnerving. In the light of fi ndings like these, retailers should be


asking themselves which technology is relevant or of interest to their customer tribes. Obviously, for some, the basic ‘scan it yourself’ offer is unacceptable, either because it requires too much techno skill or because it is of no interest, too boring. There will be other innovations such as thumb print recognition, which maybe delight some technophiles and horrify others who might consider it a ‘big brother’ development. In order to avoid marketing disasters, you need to


identify the tribes that make up your customer base. Then, to create the ultimate retail environment for them, you will have to be able to understand their motivations, IT habits and general psychology. That is just as important as being up to speed with the latest techno inventions. If you can really get to know the tribes that make up your customer base, you will know if and how to incorporate IT innovations in-store to build a stronger brand.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82