This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INTRODUCTION


of which resulted in sharply divided views on tactics among members.


1975 • CBI president Sir Ralph Bateman commissioned Lord Plowden and Sir John Partridge to carry out an independent review of the organisation.


• The CBI launched a vigorous campaign for Britain’s continued membership of the EEC, which was the subject of a referendum.


1976 • The Road to Recovery, a report produced with input from more than 500 member companies, had a significant impact on government thinking and public attitudes to issues such as cuts in spending, lower taxation and the need for further pay restraint to help beat inflation.


• Based on consultation with its members, the CBI put forward constructive views to the Bullock Inquiry into industrial democracy.


1977 • The CBI held its first national conference in Brighton. Delegates from 800 firms attended the event, which attracted coverage in the print and broadcast media.


• The CBI Pay Databank was established to research and publish information of trends affecting pay claims and settlements across many sectors of the industry.


1978 • The outbreak of strike action, now known as the Winter of Discontent, proved to be a nadir in industrial relations.


• The CBI resisted the government’s move to introduce a pay clause into contracts with industry, which was ultimately withdrawn.


1979 • The election of Margaret Thatcher as Prime Minister appeared to herald an end to industrial problems.


• The CBI published Guidelines for Action on Employee Involvement and ran a series of associated regional and national conferences.


1980 • As the government increased interest rates to as high as 16 per cent to combat inflation, CBI director-general Sir Terence Beckett delivered his controversial “bare-knuckle fight” speech at the national conference.


• The year marked a new era for the CBI, which left its home in Tothill Street in London’s Mayfair for the landmark tower of Centre Point.


1981 • The CBI started to focus on the issue of boosting national competitiveness as the government began to gain control over inflation.


• her Majesty the Queen visited the CBI in its new Centre Point home.


1982 • The CBI argued for savings from government expenditure and borrowing to be used to cut industry’s overheads and to finance new projects, thereby boosting economic activity without increasing inflation.


• It gave its backing to the Youth Training Scheme, ensuring strong employer representation on the bodies organising the scheme.


1983 • Strong campaigning by the CBI led to a reduction in the National Insurance Surcharge, saving employers £2 billion a year.


• The CBI launched its regular monitor of retail sales: the Distributive Trades Survey.


1984 • The CBI took a strong line on the promotion of energy efficiency this year, seeing it – among other things – as a major contributor to controlling costs.


• The report, A Share in the Action, was a key document in the argument for promoting greater individual participation in the creation and ownership of wealth.


1985 • A major policy discussion document, Change to Succeed, was the driving theme behind the national conference and much of the CBI’s policy work throughout the year.


• The CBI called for full UK membership of the European Monetary System, arguing that the discipline of a more stable exchange rate could help to increase Britain’s share of world trade.


1986 • The CBI contributed to Industry Year – a national programme launched by Prince Philip aimed at raising the awareness of the contribution that industry and business make to the creation of wealth.


• The CBI held a conference, Keying into the Future, and set up a panel of under-35s called Vision 2010 to study the direction British industry should take over the next 25 years.


1987 • The CBI called for an “era of investment”, saying industry needed to retain more of the wealth it generated so that it could invest in people, skills, machinery and innovation.


• The Design or Decline initiative to improve product design and marketing strategy was endorsed by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.


1988 • The Initiative 1992, a series of roadshows, kicked off a continuing process of preparing companies for the business implications of the completion of the Single European Market in 1992.


• The CBI set up a biotechnology working party, and continued to push for harmonisation of standards, testing and certification.


1989 • The CBI set up task forces to look at specific areas where competitive handicaps faced the UK economy. They investigated the building of links between schools and business, the need for transport infrastructure, a strategic approach to urban regeneration and the improvement of skills.


• Polish premier Lech Walesa addressed CBI members at Centre Point and Mikhail Gorbachev met leading industrialists at a joint CBI /DTI event. »


Opposite: Alan Lewis (left) chairman of the CBI’s 1992 Single Market initiative


015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232