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Harvey Keitel poses with robot Hector, determined to disrupt an intergalactic Adam & Eve romance in SATURN 3.


one of the most visually splendid of all fantasy films, yet its cinema- tography is credited to three men— Gennadi Tsekavyj, Viktor Yakushev and special effects cinematographer L. Dovgvillo—all with no previous screen credits to their names, leav- ing one no recourse but to credit the total cinematographic control of Aleksandr Ptushko, whose hand is never less than fully apparent. It is a pity, particularly given the film’s 4K restoration, that it wasn’t given the 1080p Blu-ray disc it deserves.


The supplements include a 15m B&W documentary about the film’s pre-production and pro- duction, in Finnish without sub- titles; a Finnish trailer; a couple of color commercials dating from the period whose relevance is not obvious to the English speaker; and a trailer for an un- related feature. Included with the disc is a 32-page color booklet that covers the film, its ludicrous reinvention for the US, and its presentation as part of the MYSTERY SCIENCE THEATER


66


3000 series in a clever format that connects pages from the US pressbook (including the hilari-


ous faux bios for its stars “Nina Anderson” and “Jon Powers”) and lavish foreign poster materi- als with a comic strip narrative about a video nerd obsessed with the film and its variant editions.


SATURN 3


1980, Scream Factory, 87m 6s, $26.99, BD-A+DVD-1 By John Charles


Mentally unstable pilot Benson (Harvey Keitel) murders a col- league and secretly replaces him on a mission to the experimental food research station Saturn 3, which is overseen by Adam (Kirk Douglas) and Alex (Farrah Fawcett). A couple three decades apart in age, the pair’s isolated, idyllic existence is almost imme- diately threatened by Benson, who makes no secret of his desire for Alex. Adding to the peril is Benson’s cargo: Hector, an eight foot tall robot with whose human


brain tissue Benson can interface. As a result, it shares the same lust for Alex and hatred of Adam, and soon turns on them. With the station shadow locked by an eclipse, the couple is on their own to combat the dual menace. One of several critical and box office duds produced by Lord Lew Grade during this period, SAT- URN 3 is a triumph of production design undone by a weak script and ineffectual leads. It is diffi- cult to fully judge Keitel’s perfor- mance as the human villain of this three-hander as his voice was replaced in post-production by Roy Dotrice, but the actor comes across as strangely pas- sive, rather than his usual impos- ing self. The lip-sync is excellent, but the effect is so distracting, it takes one out of the movie far more than Keitel’s Brooklyn ac- cent likely would have done. One is less inclined to offer any con- sideration to Douglas, who seems more interested in dem- onstrating how fit and virile he was at 64 than in offering a


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