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version that was later imported to serve as the final episode of THE TWILIGHT ZONE. Harold Swanton’s script invents many details that turn it into a kind of ghost story with mythological elements, espe- cially the figure played by great, underused Juano Hernandez. Es- chewing forward motion for a dreamlike pace amid bucolic lo- cales shot by John L. Russell (PSY- CHO) and directed by Robert Stevenson, the story telegraphs its ending (nicely done, with a use of negative), and we’re also set up by two long flashbacks shown to occur in a moment in the hero’s mind. Genre buffs will appreciate support from Kenneth Tobey, Douglas Kennedy and James Coburn.


Mystery novelist Charlotte Armstrong scripted “Across the Threshold” from L.B. Gordon’s story. It’s one of the periodic tales of phony psychics or mediums


and features a typically Hitch- cockian mother/son dance in George Grizzard and Patricia Collinge (SHADOW OF A DOUBT). Barbara Baxley does the spookery, and Arthur Hiller directs. A similar mother/son routine marks “Mother, May I Go Out to Swim?” with Will- iam Shatner and Jessie Royce Landis (NORTH BY NORTHWEST); curiously, their last name is Crane— a PSYCHO nod? Daugherty di- rects a Cavanagh script from Patrick Quentin’s story.


George Stevens, Jr. directs Norman Lloyd as “The Little Man Who Was There,” an apparently supernatural entity in the old west. One might see the ending coming in the script by Gordon Russell and Larry Ward. Other notables include director Lloyd and writer William Fay’s classic adap- tation of Roald Dahl’s “Man from the South” with Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre, and the series’


first Robert Bloch stories, one scripted by him (“The Cuckoo Clock,” directed by John Brahm) and two adapted from him (“The Cure,” “Madame Mystery”). Among other TWILIGHT ZONE alums turn- ing to crime, Charles Beaumont contributes “Backward, Turn Backward” for director Stuart Rosenberg, and Jerry Sohl scripts the ingenious “Not the Running Type” for Hiller, and the darker “Dead Weight” (starring Joseph Cotten) for Rosenberg.


On five discs, the 38 episodes are very handsome in their 1.33:1 ratio, with only the recycled title sequence looking ragged. They’re in Dolby 2.0 mono and offer En- glish subtitles. No extras, and we don’t miss them. [Editor’s Note: Disappoint-


ingly, ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS SEASON FIVE proved to be the last of the series’ proper releases through Universal.


Hitch attempts to repel an unwelcome picnic invader in one of his legendary AHP introductions.


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