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Bela Lugosi attempts to revive his zombie wife (Ellen Hall, right) with the life energy of Louise Currie in the wonky Monogram classic VOODOO MAN.


In addition to a theatrical trailer and brief featurette on im- ported American stunt coordina- tor Buddy Joe Hooker, there is a commentary featuring producer/ director Tim Jeffrey, co-producer Sue Miliken and supporting actor Graeme Blundell, originally re- corded for the 2003 Region 4 DVD release. It’s a lively discussion with much production information and anecdotes (interestingly, they ad- mit that more SAS soldiers are killed in the movie than were lost in the actual combat). Aside from periodic minor flaws in the source material, the 1080p 1.78:1 image looks superb: sharp, colorful and highly detailed. The DTS-HD MA mono sound is also quite good (the commentary includes men- tion that softer, alternate lan- guage takes were done for the “American version” but this edition


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was never used anywhere). No subtitles are provided, which would have helped some viewers discern a few sequences with heavily ac- cented deliveries and local slang. Reversible cover art is offered.


VOODOO MAN


1944, Olive Films, 62m 13s, $24.95 DVD-1, $29.95 BD-A By Tim Lucas


The most delirious of Bela Lugosi’s 1940s Poverty Row pic- tures, this Sam Katzman produc- tion for Monogram asks us to believe that Richard Marlowe (Lugosi), a country doctor with a taste for sherry, has somehow joined forces with a white voodoo priest posing as a kindly gas sta- tion proprietor (George Zucco) to lure female motorists to a false detour, leading them à la TWO


THOUSAND MANIACS! into the clutches of Marlowe, so that their will to live might be transmuted— “emotion to emotion, life to death”—to his zombie wife Evelyn (Ellen Hall), thus resur- recting her. It hasn’t worked so far, but they are assisted in this venture by a housekeeper (Micy Goti) who looks like she just dropped in from Tod Browning’s THE DEVIL-DOLL, and two un- desirables (John Carradine, Pat McKee) who pet their abductees’ hair and pound conga drums with zonked-out hillbilly abandon during the procedure, as Zucco, sporting face paint and a florid headdress, appeals to their god Ramboona in a nonsensical tape loop incantation. Making the situation still more bizarre, fu- ture FROM HELL IT CAME star Tod Andrews (billed as Michael


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