This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Gianni Garko and Giovanna Ralli are held at gunpoint by Julian Matteos in Enzo G. Castellari’s COLD EYES OF FEAR, scripted by giallo master Ernesto Gastaldi.


photography John L. Russell, Jr. (MACBETH, THE BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS, PSYCHO) are


fluent in noir motifs, including low camera angles, oblique perspec- tives, dizzying stairways, and mir- rors. Lydia’s downfall is a minor


masterpiece of noir composition, as the femme fatale’s destruc- tion leads to the dancehall girl’s


transformation into marriage material. Other featured players include Chill Wills and Otto Hulett. Auer, Fisher, Russell, Jr. and Windsor reunited for HELL’S


HALF ACRE, another noir re- leased the following year, di- rected like this film by John H. Auer (THE ETERNAL SEA). Olive Films brings this taut drama to disc in acceptable form, generally clean, with little speckling, with a dated mono track that still delivers all the essentials. It’s framed at 1.37:1 and the no-frills presentation extends to an absence of sub- titles. The differences between the DVD and Blu-ray editions of this title are negligible at best.


COLD EYES OF FEAR


Gli occhi freddi della paura aka DESPERATE MOMENTS 1971, Redemption, 91m 34s, $19.95 DVD-1, $24.95 BD-A By Lloyd Haynes


Although better known for his Westerns—ANY GUN CAN PLAY (1967) and KEOMA (1975), his Eurocrime films HIGH CRIME (1973) and THE BIG RACKET (1976), the World War II adven- ture THE INGLORIOUS BAS- TARDS (1977), and the infamous JAWS imitation GREAT WHITE (1981), this is the first of direc- tor/co-writer Enzo G. Castellari’s occasional forays into suspense. A London solicitor, Peter Flower (Gianni Garko) and his glamorous Italian girlfriend Anna (Giovanna Ralli, WHAT HAVE THEY DONE TO YOUR DAUGH- TERS?) are taken prisoner in their home by a bad-tempered, pistol- waving, leather-jacketed young thug named Quill (Julián Mateos). Quill has already murdered the butler (Leonardo Scavino) and is


awaiting the arrival of an accom- plice, ostensibly to carry out a burglary (all Quill really knows is that they’re after the contents of a wall safe), while he launches a series of verbal and physical as- saults on his two captives. When the aforementioned partner even- tually shows up, he is revealed to be Arthur Welt (ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST’s Frank Wolff, in one of his last roles be- fore committing suicide in 1971), recently released after serving 15 years in prison for a crime of which he may or may not have been guilty. Welt has targeted the property as it is owned by Peter’s uncle, the eminent high court judge (Fernando Rey) responsible for his incarceration: located somewhere in the house, there exists a file which could prove the judge to have been involved in more than a judiciary capacity.


Although for the most part a straightforward thriller until the long, drawn-out, violent climax, with the house plunged into dark- ness and the four protagonists


57


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87