search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Edited by Michael Juliano timeout.com/los-angeles/art @mjuliano Art


“LA/LA” land


Discover how the latest Pacific Standard Time showcase brings L.A.


museums and the culture of entire continents together. By Michael Juliano


CHOOSE A SINGLE metropolis as the capital city of the Americas, and it would have to be Los Angeles. It’s a bold claim, sure, but a group of art exhibitions opening in September—covering thousands of years of Latin American culture, from pre-Columbian gold work to postwar architecture—make a compelling case. “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA” assembles


70 Southern California cultural institutions, each of which presents coinciding exhibitions that explore the intersection between Los Angeles and Latin American and Latino art. While the first PST, a 2011 multi-museum


display of 20th-century art in L.A. organized by the Getty Foundation, was a coming-out party of sorts for the Los Angeles art world, “LA/LA” takes a more international approach. “[PST] established the Getty as an


institution that supports a program much bigger than itself,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum, which itself presents five exhibitions. “[With ‘LA/ LA’] we’re letting each institution focus on the aspects of the chosen theme that resonate with their collection or their community.”


DISCOVER! Earspool Depicting a Warrior


For Chon Noriega, director of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, that means leveraging L.A.’s curatorial expertise in Latin American art to challenge the traditional idea of borders. “We cannot look at Latin America as if it were ‘over there’ when our histories continue to overlap,” he says. Noriega cocurated four exhibitions at LACMA, the Autry and the Fowler; he was


Objeto ativo (cubo vermelho/branco) / Active Object (Red/white cube)


also part of a panel that developed “LA/LA”’s theme. Four years and $16 million in Getty Foundation grants later, that’s manifested itself in more than 80 exhibitions. No two are alike in content or approach. Elena Shtromberg, an associate professor at University of Utah, worked with the Getty Research Institute to showcase Latin American video art that pairs room-filling installations with a public library at West Hollywood alternative space LAXArt. “We thought about how to present this


to audiences that may not care about Latin America or video art,” she says. “We have problems that we can all relate to.” That gap-bridging element, in terms of both


geography and ideology, is precisely what makes PST such a unique museum initiative. “No one [institution] can be the final word,” says Noriega. “But collectively, we can do something that has never been done before.” à “Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA” is at various locations Sept–Jan (pacificstandardtime.org).


Time Out Los Angeles July 12–October 10, 2017


See all the museums participating in “PST:LA/LA” at timeout.com/los-angeles/art. 60


PHOTOGRAPHS (FROM TOP): JUAN PABLO MURRUGARRA; COURTESY THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76