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YOUR PERFECT DAY


Long Beach MORNING


swimming for specimens in liquid asphalt but are chipping away at a mixture of silt, sand, clay, gravel and fossils. Pit 91, which has been excavated on and off since 1915, looks more like a dig site from the movies. A visitor-observation area overlooks a wide wooden pit with catwalks planked around small pools of asphalt and sticky dirt. But fossil finds aren’t just limited to existing


pits: Metro crews tunneling the nearby Purple Line extension have already turned up camel and mastodon bones. “There was no specific sign back in the


day that said DON’T DIE OVER HERE, PLEASE. Anywhere you’re digging around here, you have the potential to find more fossils,” says Tewksbury. And more fossils mean more scientific


discoveries, even—and especially—among the smallest specimens. Recent radiocarbon dating on a particular type of beetle suggests the region was not as cold and wet 50,000 years ago as we once thought but closer to the mild L.A. we know today. In general, climate- sensitive finds like seed pods, snail shells and insect legs tell scientists how the Los Angeles basin has changed throughout the millennia—and how it may fare in the future. “It tells us which species are going to be


“There was no specific sign back in the day that said DON’T DIE OVER


HERE, PLEASE.” — Tewksbury


most vulnerable and where we can expect different types of plants and animals to move and, therefore, where we need to think about creating new wildlife reserves and conservation corridors,” says Lindsey. “It’s important to helping us survive and adapt to this new global regime that we’re going into.” à La Brea Tar Pits and Museum are at 5801 Wilshire Blvd daily 9:30am–5pm (tarpits.org). $19.


Start your day with a stroll around the serene central pond at the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden (1250 Bellflower Blvd; 562-985-8885, csulb.edu/~jgarden). Then grab a seat on the patio at the appropriately named Local Spot (6200 B E Pacific Coast Hwy; 562-498-0400, thelocalspotlongbeach.com), and dive into a plate of fluffy banana pancakes or one of a dozen different omelettes. Walk off your breakfast while exploring Naples (The Colonnade Canal and N Ravenna Dr), a residential neighborhood that’s borrowed a bit of Italian inspiration for its three man-made islands and narrow waterways.


Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden AFTERNOON


Peruse the forward-thinking collections at the Museum of Latin American Art (628 Alamitos Ave; 562-437-1689, molaa.org), then grab a bite to eat at Pike Restaurant & Bar (1836 E 4th St; 562-437-4453, pikelongbeach.com), a colorful dive that serves top-notch fish-and-chips and lobster tacos. Head toward Long Beach’s downtown waterfront, and take in the area’s sights, including the kitsch collection of shops and restaurants at Shoreline Village (401–435 Shoreline Village Dr; 562-435-2668, shorelinevillage.com), the Aquarium of the Pacific (100 Aquarium Way; 562-590-3100, aquariumofthepacific.org) and, visible just across the bay, the handsome and historic luxury ocean liner, the Queen Mary (1126 Queens Hwy; 877-342-0738, queenmary.com).


NIGHT


Swing by indie record shop Fingerprints (420 E 4th St; 562- 433-4996, fingerprintsmusic .com) in the early evening for a good chance at catching a live show or just to thumb through stacks of vinyl. Then sit down for a meal in the rustic yet refined dining room of 4th & Olive Restaurant (743 E 4th St; 562- 269-0731, 4thandolive.com), where seafood plates pair with German fare like brats, pretzels and pickles. Wash it all down with a craft brew at Beachwood BBQ & Brewing (210 E 3rd St; 562-436- 4020, beachwoodbbq.com) or a whiskey flight at the Blind Donkey (149 Linden Ave; 562-247-1511, theblinddonkey.com). ■ Michael Juliano


BBQ & Brewing 39 July 12–October 10, 2017 Time Out Los Angeles


PHOTOGRAPHS: TOP LEFT: COURTESY NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY; TOP CENTER: COURTESY CC/FLICKR/SERGEI GUSSEV; BOTTOM RIGHT: COURTESY BEACHWOOD BBQ & BREWING


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