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event preview | Compounding World Forum


Right: NFM’s TEM twin-


screw extrud- ers are used


for compound- ing polyolefins or engineering resins


ing twin-screw extruder for compounding and recycling applications. The machine offers a high free volume and a very high filling level, combined with excellent melt pressure stability and the lowest possible melt temperature. ❙ www.mas-austria.com


Mixaco is a leading supplier of mixers for the plastics colour industry, including high, medium and low intensity blending systems. Headquar- tered in Germany, the company has a test facility in Greer, South Carolina. This technical resource can be used for blender trials and for developing new formulations. ❙ www.mixaco.com


Modern Dispersions Inc (MDI) is a leading manufac- turer and compounder of black masterbatch and specialty compounds, including conductive grades and WPCs. It is one of the largest carbon black masterbatch producers in North America with plants in Leominster, MA, and Fitzgerald, GA. ❙ www.moderndispersions.com


NFM Welding Engineers produces TEM co-rotating twin-screw extruders that are used for compounding polyolefins or engineering resins, as well as for masterbatch production and recycling. It also offers WE counter-rotating non-intermeshing machines with high free-volume and low-shear. ❙ www.nfm.net


Nordson will be highlighting its diverse range of polymer melt delivery equipment which is now grouped together under the BKG brand. The


product line-up includes pelletizing systems; melt filtration equipment, gear pumps, ovens and valves. ❙ www.nordsonpolymerprocessing.com


Above: Nordson will be


highlighting recent innova- tions in its BKG pelletizing systems such as new cutter hubs


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OCSiAl is an international nanotechnology company that has opened a plant for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Marketed under the Tuball name, they can be used in low loadings to enhance the strength, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of polymers. ❙ www.ocsial.com


Palsgaard of Sweden produces sustainable vegetable- COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2016


based functional agents for polymer applications. Its additives, which are food-contact-approved, include anti-fogging and anti-static agents for polyolefins and additive masterbatch applications. ❙ www.palsgaard.com


Parkinson Technologies manufactures a range of plastics processing equipment, including Key Filters screen-changers. Its KCH continuous-belt screen- changer delivers uniform extrusion pressure with its hydraulic puller action reacting rapidly to disruptions caused by varying contamination levels. ❙ www.parkinsontechnologies.com


Pinfa NA is a non-profit North American trade organi- sation that represents manufacturers and users of non-halogenated phosphorous, inorganic and nitrogen flame retardants. It works with Pinfa, its sister organisation in Europe, which is a sector group of the European Chemical Industry Council. ❙ www.pinfa.org


Plas Mec of Italy is a leading manufacturer of industrial mixing systems for a variety of applications including masterbatch, pigments, PVC dry blend, wood-plastic composites, thermoplastic rubbers and powder coatings. It also offers laboratory mixers and operates an extensive test facility. ❙ www.plasmec.it


Polyram is a leading manufacturer of engineering thermoplastic compounds for the automotive, electri- cal, irrigation and construction industries. Headquar- tered in Israel, the international company offers a wide range of PA, PE, PBT, PET, PC, POM, PVDF, LGF and styrenic compounds and alloys. ❙ www.polyram.co.il


www.compoundingworld.com


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