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processing | Continuous and batch mixers


Right: The C tec PRO system demonstrated at K2016 by MTI is due for delivery to Clariant for masterbatch production in early 2017


(for customers in various industries). MTI also showed a more conventional heating/


cooling system configured for mixing wood fibre-rein- forced compounds (WPCs). The company points out that, in contrast to PVC compounds processed on such systems, the low density fibres provide a greater challenge for heating and then, once the polymer melts, much more torque is needed to mix everything together. Installed power is therefore around twice as high as on units for PVC. In addition, much better aspiration is needed to remove moisture. The new unit is said to be capable of reducing water content down to below 0.1% and possibly as low as 0.05%. The heating/cooling unit incorporates the latest


version of MTI’s Vent tec aspiration system that controls its own performance independently as a function of actual process parameters. The system continuously monitors all actual operating conditions via key parameters such as intake air and system air tempera- tures, air pressure, humidity and the aspiration air flow rate. The electronic controller then analyses these variables and adjusts the aspiration system accordingly with due regard to the filter status, keeping aeration airflow conditions constant. Vent tec 2.0 devices are available in various sizes for all mixing volumes and accommodate nearly all ATEX environments and mixer designs. They can be retrofitted to MTI systems and other manufacturers’ machines.


Below: MTI also showed a heating/cooling mixer with the latest version of its Vent tec aspiration system on its stand at K2016


Critical for colour Stephan Poller, General Manager for Zeppelin Systems’ Mixing Technology business, which produces Henschel- Mixers, also emphasises the need for increasing up-time in mixing operations. He says the company has in recent times been focusing on the use of its latest CMS container in mixer colour mixing, where the ability to clean equipment to get it back into operation quickly is critical


(cleaning can often take much longer than mixing). For this reason, the company will launch a new design at the beginning of next year incorporating changes to both the mixing head and mixing tool to make it easier to clean and maintain. For example, material build-up on the mixing tool should be almost eliminated in the new design, Poller claims. In addition, the mixing head will be much easier to clean than in current models. And with many products sensitive to high temperatures, thermal control is also being improved. “You want mixing to be as intense as possible, at the lowest temperature rise possible for the most gentle material treatment and in order to minimise material build-up in the mixer,” Poller says. Zeppelin’s Henschel-Mixer series MB for sensitive


materials that require particularly accurate tempera- ture control is now available with an increased number of cooling circuits so that the temperature can be varied across the various cooling zones: in the mixing bowl itself, the shaft, and the mixing tool. The mixing bowl can also be both heated and cooled. The company says this increased zoning is complemented by improved energy data acquisition and control loops on tool speed, water temperature, and other process variables and consumers. Poller says intelligent process control makes it possible to keep internal temperatures close to the polymer Tg for specified periods, for example. Turning to the company’s FM high intensity mixer,


Poller says the company has developed numerous new features to make it easier to clean. These include the Henschel Transformer Cleaning package, which comprises a three-piece mixing bowl design with hydrau- lic lifting units. The cylindrical bowl part can be swivelled


56 COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


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