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news | 2016 Coperion targets masterbatch


New hardware introductions from Coperion included a special version of its STS Mc11


extruder configured specifically


for the masterbatch market and an updated “compact” variant of its high perfor- mance ZSK Mc18


extruder.


The company also shared its “virtual” vision of the future of compounding plant design. The STS Mc11


Coperion’s STS 35 Mc11


is targeted at


the colour master- batch market


ments while speeding up commissioning. The new layout also improves access to the processing section.


The machine was shown with a


K-Tron S-60 gravimetric feeder and ZS-B side feeder using Coperion’s patented FET feeding


unit on display


was a 35mm screw diameter model configured specifically for colour masterbatch production, where flexibility and fast product changeover are said to be top priorities. It features a new die design that is claimed to almost completely eliminate dead zones, enhanc- ing product quality and speeding up cleaning and changeover times. The machine package includes a K-Tron T35 volumetric twin screw feeder and Coperi- on’s CSpro basic control. Coperion Director of Marketing Bettina König said the STS masterbatch machine is


US start for Hexpol TPE


Hexpol TPE said at the show it had started up its first production in North America. The company, which last month announced a rebranding of its Elasto and Müller Kunststoffe businesses under the Hexpol TPE name, said it had installed TPE produc- tion and product develop- ment capabilities at Hexpol’s RheTech Colors plant at Sandusky in Ohio. Early focus for the


company in the US will be on its Dryflex TPEs. ❙ www.hexpoltpe.com


20


manufactured at the company’s plant in China but is intended to be a global model. “We are planning to market it throughout the world, not just in China. It has a CE certificate and we have already sold one to a European customer,” she said. Systems will be integrated locally with K-Tron equipment produced in the US or Switzerland. The updated Compact version of the ZSK Mc18 machine features a new control cabinet arrangement that is pre-cabled at the factory, saving in floor space require-


technology. The company also showed an updated version of its ZS-EG side degassing unit, which now incorporates fast one-step dismounting and simple three-step dismantling for cleaning. The “virtual” element in Coperion’s display was a virtual reality suite where visitors could “walk through” a full compounding installation. “We are convinced this is the future for planning a compounding plant. You can show the plant to the customer and modify it before anything is produced,” said König. “At the moment it is a vision but we are not that far away from using it – one or two years maybe.” ❙ www.coperion.com


Trinseo adds Magnum in China


Trinseo said it would com- mence production of its Magnum ABS resins at its plant at Zhangjiagang in China in the middle of next year. According to Tim Stedman,


Senior Vice President and Business President Basic Plastics and Feedstocks at Trinseo, the new line is “world scale and significant” in terms of volume and will enable the company to grow in the Chinese automotive sector as well as supporting its global business.


“This is part of a global


network of [Magnum ABS] plants and will enable us to grow our business. Our plants in Europe are pretty much


COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2016


Improved colour is one of the claimed advantages of Trinseo’s Magnum ABS (pictured left against a typical emulsion grade)


maxed out so this will allow us to grow in China and globally,” he said. The new line uses Trinseo’s


proprietary continuous polymerisation technology that is claimed to result in a whiter and more consistent product with better thermal and


mechanical properties than the emulsion ABS equipment used by competitors in China, which is said to be a key advantage in any application where appearance is important as it can reduce masterbatch usage. ❙ www.trinseo.com


www.compoundingworld.com


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