This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Coupling agents | additives


New coupling agent introductions promise to improve adhesion and dispersion of reinforcing fibre and filler particles in polymer matrices. Jennifer Markarian reports on the latest introductions


Developments in coupling agents


Surface-modifying additives, such as coupling and wetting agents, can help improve dispersion and adhesion when adding fibres, mineral fillers, and nanomaterials to polymers. A number of new introduc- tions over recent months – and several new launches at October’s K2016 trade fair in Germany – promise to boost flow and performance properties across a wide variety of applications. Glass and other reinforcing fibres are typically used


at high levels to improve mechanical properties of compounds. Their effectiveness in this role depends to a considerable extent on how well they are dispersed in the polymer and on the connection between the fibre and the polymer. Michelman’s new Hydrosize Link U470 and U480 fibre sizings are polyurethane dispersions designed to react with polyamide 6 or 66 resin matrices. Hydrosize Link U470 is designed for chopped strand


fibre, while U480 can be used with either chopped strand or continuous fibre reinforcements. The enhanced reactive sizings are added during the fibre manufactur- ing process, but they become more reactive during the compounding step. The sizings improve composite performance in applications such as automotive under-the-hood parts, where polymer materials can experience extreme exposure to water, ethylene glycol, and high temperatures, says the company. Another new family of polymeric additives from Michelman, Hydrosize Connect, is added at the compounding step and offers enhanced coupling, in


www.compoundingworld.com


synergy with a matching Hydrosize fibre sizing, to improve wetting, adhesion, and impregnation of fibres and improve composite performance. The first additive in the Hydrosize Connect family is Hydrosize Connect WP339, intended for PE compounds such as those for extruded pipe. Michelman plans to introduce additional products under both the Hydrosize Link and Hydrosize Connect brands.


Grafted solutions BYK’s next-generation of maleic acid anhydride-grafted polypropylene (MAH-PP) is a polymer emulsion that is added to the glass-fibre sizing during manufacturing of the fibres. The sizing provides temperature stability and silane resistance, and improves final part properties such as aging and mechanical and detergent resistance. The first product in the series is Aquacer 1868. At K2016, BYK also showcased its Scona coupling agents that can be added to the formulation during the compounding process to improve, for example, carbon fibre adhesion in automotive composites . Brüggemann Chemical’s new flow enhancer,


Brüggolen TP-P1507, is designed to improve process- ability of glass-filled polyamides in both compounding and injection moulding applications. The additive also maintains mechanical properties, including impact strength, tensile strength, E-modulus, and elongation at break, says Klaus Bergmann, Business Unit Manager Polymer Additives at Brüggemann Chemical.


November 2016 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 45


Main image: Under-hood automotive applications


are a key target area for the latest sizing and coupling agents. Image: Michelman


s


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98