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news | 2016


Intelligent approach at Leistritz


Leistritz unveiled what it described as its “most intelligent machine ever” at the show – the ZSE 35 iMAXX twin screw model designed for cost-effective masterbatch production. Following on from the


introduction of the ZSE 27 iMAXX machine, the ZSE 35 iMAXX is designed to accom- modate the frequent cleaning and product changeovers typical of the masterbatch market. The first customer for the design is fast-turnaround US custom compound producer REV Materials. Features of the ZSE 35 iMAXX include full enclosure of the processing and drive units and integration of the cooling/ heating system within the machine frame, which in its standard form can handle process lengths from 24 to 48 L/D. The machine also supports mounting of add-on modules such as feeders on both sides. A synchronous drive is used


as standard on the ZSE 35 iMAXX. “This is a big step


Leistritz describes the ZSE 35 iMAXX masterbatch extruder as its most intelligent to date


forward in energy saving,” said Leistritz Managing Director of Sales Anton Furst. “Traditional motors consume too much energy under part load.” Further energy optimisation potential is provided through the use of an optional torque measurement control system. Leistriz also used the show


to reveal the design for its largest machine to date – a ZSE 260 MAXX machine for polymer production plants offering throughputs of up to 40 tonnes an hour. Furst said the differentiator in this new design is that it uses a variable speed drive. “In these big


extruders the competition has fixed screw speeds or two screw speeds so quality is linked to throughput. We think variable drive technology is important in improving the quality of big lines,” he said. The largest machine in the


current Leistritz machine line-up is the ZSE 180 MAXX, an example of which is being used by Kazakhstan-based PP producer Neftekhim at its PP production plant at Pavlodar. It is running a PP viscosity modification process at rates up to 8 tonnes/h. ❙ www.leistritz.comwww.revmaterials.com


PTS extends non-flame PC range


Polymer Technology & Services (PTS) extended its Tristar line of polycarbon- ate-based compounds with four halogen-compliant grades with UL 746R and 746H certification. UL 746R certification


indicates compliance with the EU’s RoHS legislation, which limits the amount of lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) a plastic can contain. UL 746H certifies conformity with the chlorine and bromine requirements of IEC 61249. The new grades are


intended for electrical and telecommunication devices, business machines, and small and large appliances. They will be available in Europe, North America and Asia and offer UL94 flammability ratings ranging from V-0 to 5VA. ❙ www.ptsllc.com


ExxonMobil adds to Vistamaxx modifier line


ExxonMobil unveiled a new low viscosity Vistamaxx grade – Vistamaxx 8880 – intended to be used in conjunction with its Vistamaxx 6202 or 6502 polyolefin compound modifica- tion products to improve flow or increase filler levels. Including Vistamaxx 8880 in the injection moulding formulations can improve flow


16 COMPOUNDING WORLD | November 2016


and enhance cooling, allowing cycle times to be reduced. The material can also


improve the performance of films. Spanish compounder GCR Group is using the Vistamaxx additive in its Granic 1522 CaCO3


masterbatch,


which is used in production of waste bags. It reports that one customer has achieved twice


the dart impact strength and a 16% downgauging using a 20% addition level. Vistamaxx 8880 is produced


at ExxonMobil’s facility in Singapore. It has direct food contact approval in all markets except the EU, where an application is in process. ❙ www.exxonmobilchemical.comwww.gcrgroup.es


www.compoundingworld.com


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