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MIDDLE PENINSULA GARDEN CLUB


Celebrates Photos courtesy of Laura Ann Brooks


Lily Show, sanctioned by the North American Lily Society (NALS), at Essex County High School in Tappahannock on Thursday, June 22, 2017, a curtain will rise on one of the most beautiful and dramatic flowers in the botanical world of hybrid- izing. Approximately 65 artistic arrangements and 300 horticulture stems will be on display. This exhibition has no admission fee and will be open


to the public from 2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Beginning with ancient tombs of the Egyptian Pharaohs


followed by Roman frescoes in Pompeii, lilies have decorated tombs and walls, feasts and celebrations in early western civilizations. Symbol of the Virgin Mary and her Christ Child, the Madonna lily spread across Europe with the early Christian church, just as the (Martagon) “Star of Constantinople” traced Turkish conquests in eastern Europe. Mediterranean lilies became the emblems of caliphs and kings during the Renaissance. With the discovery of North America, species lilies L. canadese, philadelphicum and L. supurbum traveled from the swamps of the Americas to the gardens of Versailles, banquets of London and markets of Amstersdam. By the nineteenth century, the


68 May/June 2017 W Lilies


hen The Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula (GCMP) hosts the Garden Club of Virginia (GCV) 75th Annual


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