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adorns its trappings. Fourteen jumpers, horses that go up and down, are located in the middle row of three rows. Smaller than the standers and less elaborately decorated; they are adorned with tassels, fringes, jewels, feathers, and medallions. The inside row consists of eighteen horses even smaller in size. Fourteen are jumpers and four are standers. Although four poses are duplicated, the blankets and trappings differ. Tassels, scallops, fringes, and keys are included in the decorations.” An Italian immigrant named Frank Carretta carved the horses and other embellishments for the original PTC#50 carou- sel. He was hired in 1912 and became carving foreman of PTC in 1915. Amazingly, each of the 48 horses is a unique work of art with different facial expressions and body positions. No two horses are exactly alike. Daniel C. Miller carved the two chariots and became renowned for the patriotic themes of his horse- drawn chariots. The son of German immigrants, he studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and worked for both PTC and William H. Dentzel, another famous carousel maker. On May 23, 1920, the summer season opened at Buckroe Beach with a brand-new attraction, the Buckroe Beach Carousel. It was described as “a most up-to-date carousel with jump- ing horses.” People packed the attraction. It was a great crowd pleaser from the start. On July 4, 1929, there were 15,000 visi- tors a day and 10,000 revelers at night. The Buckroe Beach Carousel survived a terrible storm in August 1933 and Hurricane Hazel in 1954. Fortunately, the carousel was protected from any later storms and the elements by a glass-walled building constructed in the late 1960s. It did not, however, survive changing tastes, high maintenance costs


The House & Home Magazine


17


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