search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
stresses of everyday life. It may be all these at different times. Other rowers get hooked by the kind


of rowing that becomes a challenge to self. They may still row alone, but they contin- ually push themselves to do better—row smoother, row faster, row further, row lon- ger, in effect creating their own personal records as goals to later surpass. For these people, rowing can change from casual fun to the strenuous effort usually associated with team racing.


While teens may get into rowing be- cause of a school sports program, people can start at any age. It’s not necessary to be a natural athlete. Skill, strength, and stam- ina come with training, training, training. Rowing is often the logical replacement for an earlier enthusiasm for running, which becomes more difficult in later years as it stresses knee joints and adds to back problems. Another advantage of rowing is that its exercise benefits don’t have to stop in the winter months; workouts can be maintained anytime on indoor rowing machines called ergometers. Rowing clubs offer a good way to get started. They’re found wherever the water- ways make the sport not only feasible but enjoyable. A club can help the beginner to learn, offer the intermediate rower tips for improvement, and provide opportunities for competition to rowers who want to try racing.


The rowing boat itself can mean any number of types, from a traditional wooden rowboat kept at the family cottage to a carbon fiber racing shell or a boat designed for open-water rowing. Between the extremes are any number of variations. How the boat will be used naturally deter- mines which type the rower buys, always with an eye on budget constraints. Creeks near high schools or college campuses are home to each school’s row- ing team. Their long, narrow boats are called shells and are made in a size range of 27 to almost 60 feet. Shells are further described by “sculls” (where each rower uses two oars) and “sweep rowing” (where each rower has two hands on one oar). Racing shells may hold 2, 4, or 8 rowers. Some shells carry another person—the coxswain (pronounced cox’n)—who steers the boat, controls the rhythm, and serves as the onboard coach. In school sports, rowing is called


“crew,” and this may be where the activity most obviously moves from sport to obses-


The House & Home Magazine 21


Gloucester’s Women’s Senior Four plus coxswain (from left Ashleigh Dough, Mackenzie Marbain, Autumn Rose, Coach Joey Moore, Bailey Hamilton, and Casey Martin) winning the Virginia State.


Williamsburg Boat Club


Casey Martin (senior) of the Gloucester crew team rowing the single.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100