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Peet’s coffee dates back 50+ years to a Dutch coffee roaster


named Alfred Peet, who was the father of coffee roasting in the U.S. Alfred Peet taught his artisan craft to the original founders of Starbucks, and changed the way Americans think about coffee. Today, Peet’s Coffee & Tea offers superior quality coffees and teas in multiple forms, by sourcing the best quality coffee beans and tea leaves in the world, adhering to strict high-quality and taste standards, and controlling product quality through its unique direct store delivery and small batch roasting process. And the good news is that now Peet’s Coffee can be enjoyed at the Front Porch Coffeehouse on Main Street in Kilmarnock.


MAKING SENSE OF THE MENU OPTIONS


Coffee aficionados devoted to the art of drinking coffee and espresso have their own language of sorts. Baristas and cashiers are trained to understand how to order and prepare all the options. Latte, espresso, cappuccino – there are so many different types of coffee it becomes a language itself! This simple guide will explain the differences between some of the most popular espresso, coffee and tea


AMERICANO If you like the caffeine boost you get from espresso but the taste is just too strong, an Americano is the brew for you. It’s a shot of espresso with twice the amount of hot water. The term “caffè Americano” specifically is Italian for “American coffee”. There is a popular belief that the name has its origins in World War II when American soldiers would dilute espresso with hot water to approximate the coffee to which they were accustomed in the U.S.


MILK OPTIONS Most beverages that require milk are typically prepared with 2% milk unless ordered with Skim Milk, Almond Milk, Soy Milk, Half & Half or Whole Milk. All these options are available and can be ordered as substitutes. Fancy terms such as Breve are used for substituting Half & Half in the beverage.


CAPPUCCINO Some people like their coffee drinks black. Others prefer some milk in their coffee. One of the most popular espresso drinks, a cappuccino, is made by pairing a shot of espresso with a small amount of steamed milk and a mountain of foam. It can be jazzed up with a myriad of syrup flavors such as vanilla, honey, caramel, and hazelnut.


The House & Home Magazine 55


based drinks. So the next time you get into line at Front Porch Coffeehouse, you’ll be prepared to order something you are sure to love.


ESPRESSO The espresso is the foundation and the most important part to every espresso based drink. It’s a small shot of caffeine — usually about 1.1 ounces. It is both stronger and more flavorful than a regular cup of coffee. Also available in decaf. Espresso is ordered by the shot – 1, 2, or 3 shots but can also be added to any beverage as an addition – for example, you like a kick of caffeine in your brewed coffee – then add a shot of espresso.


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