search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
proximity to their indoor kitchen so they can move quickly between the two for scarcely used kitchen gadgets, extra utensils, and the like. Another huge benefit of installing your outdoor kitchen close


to your existing kitchen is that you will have water, electric, and even perhaps propane lines in close proximity. This can be a huge savings when installing new lines. Pavers or cement are an excellent choice for outdoor kitchens


because they can be washed down easily. Other options include gravel or decking materials. You may even be able to work within an existing deck or patio with a few modifications. It is great if you can add gas, electric, and water lines before placing the flooring, but talk to your contractor to see if your existing space can be utilized with just a few modifications. When deciding on dimensions you will want to consider


seating and serving areas, what type of appliances you will use, adding a fire pit or heat source to extend use into cooler months, and existing landscaping or lawn parameters. This is why it is so important to bring experienced professionals in on your project early. Not only will they be able to design your space for you they will also be able to catch ventilation issues and piping issues saving you money down the road. Depending on the scope of your undertaking, an experienced


contractor will also be able to bring in the expertise of a landscape architect to determine, based on the characteristics of your lawn, what is the safest way to invent your dream outdoor kitchen. This is especially important if you are adding a large patio on a steeply sloped hill, the river, or a creek. When we envision an outdoor kitchen we tend to


automatically think of stone pavers. One of the reasons for this is that they are so easy to maintain once installed. They are very low maintenance and resist weathering, but there are a ton of new options on the market that will perform as well. These materials include tile, stainless steel, and polymer. Another decision to make is how much outdoor storage your


One of the most beautiful things an outdoor kitchen can give a family is the ability to remain with their family. You extend your living space outdoors and can even enhance the ease of many common dishes.


The House & Home Magazine


kitchen will require. Along with a place to store outdoor cooking accessories you will also need a place to store plates, flatware, and glasses. There are so many choices in polymer cabinets you may even be able to find one that matches your indoor cabinetry! Exploring these options can make the transition from our indoor living space to our outdoor space more seamless. The next big decision is selecting appliances for your space to


meet your outdoor cooking needs. This is where the fun begins. There are so many options available for outdoor kitchens that weren’t available even 10 years ago. For an outdoor cooking space you will need a cooking surface, refrigeration, and water. This means it’s time to start shopping for a grill, refrigerator, and sink.


When we think of outdoor cooking what immediately comes


to mind is the grill. There are so many options available. The old question used to be do you prefer gas or charcoal? Now you can choose from gas ranges of all sizes, charcoal, smokers, and even brick pizza ovens imported from Italy. Another choice is do you want your cooking surface to be


built in or stand alone? Gas grills can be built directly into a paver wall with a circular opening for you to place your Big Green Egg. Many outdoor kitchens incorporate several of these


51


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100