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MASTERING SELF-DEFENSE Staying Aware Avoids Problems by Aimee Hughes


“I


began my personal training in the Non-Violent System (NVS) of self-defense with Grandmaster


Verkerke in 1996,” says Eddie Rose, senior instructor of NVS Peace in the Midst of Non-Violence at Shangri-La Springs, in Bonita Springs, Florida. This aspect of the martial art form seicho jutsu was created by Cana- dian Daniel Verkerke, Ph.D., as a simple self-defense system to teach and perpetuate nonviolence; he continues to share it with the public,


46 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


law enforcement, corporations and private security firms in the U.S. and internationally. Nonviolent self-defense is akin to the


dynamics of bullfighting. “The matador never matches his strength with the enormous animal; rather, he redirects the energy of the bull with simple and precise movements—counterbalanc- ing—and letting the bull’s energy move past him,” explains Rose. He’s trained everyday people of all ages and walks of life in this approach, in the U.S., UK,


Puerto Rico and Jamaica. “As they train, students begin to


feel more secure wherever they go, because they are learning how to be safe even in the midst of physical con- frontation,” says Rose. “They wind up feeling more empowered as they learn how to neutralize aggression simply and effectively.” Practicing NVS increases balance,


coordination, overall flexibility and joint mobility. Its soft, circular, martial arts movements, combined with


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