search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
along with getting adequate fl uids,” says Wilson. She recommends foods that assist lactation called galatactagogues, like almonds, avocados, legumes, kale and spinach. To increase milk production, add fennel to meals or smoothies, or turn to capsules.


Keep Moving with Intention Wilson recommends yoga, swimming, walking or light jogging three to fi ve times a week, for 20 minutes a day. “Squatting like a child on your haunches is a great exercise for childbirth,” she says, noting that 20 squats daily will strengthen core muscles. Sitting on an exercise ball instead of a desk chair or couch also engages core muscles, while improving posture. “Regular exercise brings more energy,


better sleep, reduced stress, higher spir- its, better odds of an easy labor, faster post-delivery recovery and reduced risk of gestational diabetes and high blood pressure during pregnancy,” Bregman fi nds. She recommends a prenatal yoga practice that includes breathing and visualizations. This restorative form of yoga offers gentle stretch- ing, promotes good circulation and naturally supports relief or healing of many possible pregnancy ailments. “To alleviate physical distress, try chiro-


THE CONNECTIONS ESTABLISHED BETWEEN MOTHER AND


CHILD ARE MUCH STRONGER


WHEN SHE PROGRESSES THROUGH PREGNANCY AND BIRTH FROM A NATURAL PERSPECTIVE.


— KRISTY WILSON


practic prenatal care,” says Phillips. Light fi nger contact from an experienced practitioner


helps realign bony segments and restores the body’s normal tone. “A prenatal expert can adjust so the mom’s body maintains its balance and the baby is free to move.” Craniosacral therapy reestablishes balance to the mem- branes that encapsulate the brain and spinal cord.


Prepare the Mind “Just say, ‘No thanks,’ to friends who want to burden you with stories of their long, excruciating labors,” O’Mara advises. “Protect yourself from toxic people and their horror stories. Focus on maintaining your own good health and surround yourself with people that have experienced a normal birth. Plan to have uplifting support during the birthing process and in the postpartum period.” A woman easily infl uenced by others might ask her doula,


midwife or spouse to be her advocate. A woman that needs to exercise control might seek such assistance for peace of mind, knowing that her wishes will be followed. “‘Pain’ is a fear-based word,” to be avoided in conversa-


tions about labor, Wilson explains. “Don’t fear the strength of contractions. They are doing exactly what your body


38 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


needs to do to give birth.” As a midwife, she helps moms relax and embrace these intensely important sensations by focusing on what is going on in their body. Research published in the journal Cell Adhe- sion & Migration shows that the hormones released during labor enter into the baby’s immune system to also strengthen the child.


Spark the Spirit Affi rmations can positively state the mother-to-be’s intentions for pregnancy and birth. Examples include: “Birth is a safe and won- derful experience. I am choosing the right path for my birth. I trust my body and my instincts. I have all the support I need.” Wilson recommends choosing two to four that resonate, repeating them every morning while gazing into the mirror, placing them on the refrig- erator door and even having them pop up on a smartphone. “Meditation prepares you for


childbirth and can also be soothing during labor by offering tools that push away fear,” says O‘Mara. She likes this mantra from Thich Nhat Hahn’s book, Being Peace: “Breath-


ing in, I calm myself, breathing out, I smile.” To begin, sit comfortably in a quiet room with eyes


closed. For women new to meditation, Wilson suggests light- ing a scented or colored candle and noticing the colors and movement of the fl ame for something physical to focus on. “This calming practice is important because labor becomes like a meditation,” she says. The mother copes through the contraction, then uses her meditation skills to reset, refocus and ground herself before the next contraction. Wilson and Bregman both encourage expectant mothers


to keep a journal during pregnancy. “Record thoughts and experiences. Sometimes dreams tell things about the child, who has a story too,” advises Wilson.


Design a Special Experience


Create a Birth Plan Those that prefer a home birth can fi nd a compatible midwife through a natural birthing community such as the National Association of Certifi ed Professional Midwives, International Childbirth Education Association and La Leche


Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56