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consciouseating


Milk Minus the Moo Evaluating Alternatives to Dairy


by Judith Fertig W


hen dietary concerns, food sensitivities or curiosity prompt us to try alternative


milks, it helps to know the basic facts about the leading types, to choose the best ones for us.


Almond Milk Pro: Almond milk is low in fat and can be easily made at home, so ingredients are known. One cup of homemade almond milk has about 40 calories, one gram of protein, 6 percent of the daily value (DV) for calcium, three grams of fat and eight grams of carbohydrates. As for store-bought options, one cup of Silk Organic Almond Original contains 60 calories, with one gram of protein, 10 percent DV for calcium, two-and- a-half grams of fat and eight grams of carbohydrates. Con: Almond milk is neither high in


protein nor calcium; it’s not as nutrition- ally packed as other alternatives. Some might not care for the faint nutty flavor.


42 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


Coconut Milk Pro: Dr. Josh Axe, a functional medi- cine physician who owns the popular natural health website, DrAxe.com, and the Exodus Health Center, near Nashville, Tennessee, points out, “High in medium-chain triglycerides, coconut milk is a very filling, fat-burning food.” One cup of homemade coconut milk has about 450 calories, six grams of protein and 64 grams of fat, plus trace minerals such as manganese, phos- phorus, magnesium, iron and copper. Canned coconut milk is similar: one cup of Native Forest Unsweetened Coconut Milk Classic contains 420 calories, three grams of protein and 45 grams of fat, plus trace minerals such as manganese, phosphorus, magne- sium, iron and copper in each cup. Con: High in fat and calories, coco-


nut milk may not be the best choice for drinking every day, but is delicious in Asian-style soups and curries.


Hemp Milk Pro: Hemp milk, made from hulled hemp seeds, contains 10 essential amino acids, including key fats. “Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are vital for healthy functioning of the brain,” says Axe. Hemp milk works well for people with tree nut allergies. One cup of Pacific Hemp Original


has 140 calories, three grams of protein, 50 percent DV for calcium, five grams of fat and 20 grams of carbohydrates. Living Harvest Tempt Hemp Milk has 80 calories per cup, two grams of protein, 30 percent DV for calcium, eight grams of fat and one gram of carbohydrates. Con: Grassy-tasting hemp milk tends to separate in hot coffee.


Rice Milk Pro: High in vitamins and calcium when fortified, rice milk made from brown rice is also high in vitamins. According to Ted Kallmyer, author of


nioloxs/Shutterstock.com


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