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DUMFRIES AND GALLOWAY HOSPITAL


25


Dumfries itself cannot realistically be expected to meet demand long-term. Medical facilities in the main building include a combined assessment unit, accident and emergency facility (A&E), a surgical complex with four major operating theatres, oncology and critical care units, and an outpatient centre.


The £212m hospital was procured under the Scottish Government Non-Profit Distributing (NPD) model, with Ryder as the lead architect collaborating with NBBJ and Laing O’Rourke as main contractor.


Key themes


Designing a greenfield hospital from the ground up sounds like an architect’s dream but the team had to ensure they also met the detailed healthcare requirements and be sympathetic to an earlier ‘reference design’ the board had drawn up to obtain outline planning approval. Working closely with the board, the


ADF APRIL 2017


practice evolved a series of key objectives into four core themes that informed and underpinned the architecture and interior design, with a strong emphasis on quality. Firstly, the design needed to be people- centred, attractive and provide uplifting and therapeutic environments with natural views and plenty of good quality daylight. Secondly it had to facilitate efficient operation, good space utilisation, clear wayfinding, innovative use of IT, long-term flexibility and easy analysis of clinical workflows. Creating a safe, welcoming and accessible building and enabling staff to deliver effective care formed the remaining themes. Bearing these in mind, Ryder and NBBJ looked at the reference design to see where they could improve it, as partner Paul Bell explains. “The board’s aspiration to have an integrated emergency care centre hadn’t been realised as the combined assessment unit and A&E were quite separate. We


LIGHT


The light-filled reception area creates a pleasant welcome to the hospital, and from there the primary circulation routes are obvious


The architects segregated the main internal circulations by floor to avoid creating shared flows or cross-flow clashes


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