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SCOTTISH NATIONAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION (SNBTS) CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE, EDINBURGH


So, what will the Jack Copland Centre do and what is the technical challenge? Its primary function is the collection of blood donations from five static donor centres along with those from community and workplace collection sessions across Scotland. These donations will then be tested and processed into red cells, plasma and platelets before distributing those end products to patients.


Additionally the Centre will process, test and store tissue and cell products, as well as house a hub for cutting edge cellular therapy, research and innovation. All of this work is subject to strict guidelines and inspections, designed to ensure a safe and secure working environment. One way this was achieved in the design was to ensure that waste would have a specific route out of the building which would never ‘cross paths’ with incoming materials or outgoing products. Law explains: “We started with a diagram of the flow pattern that's like a very complex bowl of spaghetti. “It’s the SNBTS mindset to be incredibly rigorous about keeping everything separate. A failure by SNBTS can mean serious risks to patients so they must be incredibly careful.”


Designs that separate and connect


Artist Steven Aalders used a range of colours in a very striking geometric pattern – it is the dominant feature in the Arcade Andy Law, Reiach and Hall


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In order to keep materials and products apart, yet ensuring staff still feel connected with each other and different parts of the building, Reiach and Hall developed a two-part solution: accommodate the facil- ity’s different functions in strips built alongside and above each other, and exten- sive use of glass throughout. Law explains: “The solution we presented, which people didn’t expect, was to make part of the building over three- storeys rather than two. We put the testing and Research, Development and Innovation (RD&I) function on the top floor and linked these down to the blood processing hall on the ground floor with dumb waiters for samples to go up and down. That really cracked some of the difficulties of getting the complex circulation systems to work.” In between, half of the first floor is a dedicated plant area filled with services equipment. This is one way the building’s design tackles the issue of the sheer volume of services needed yet ensuring they are close to where they’re needed. At the heart of the Jack Copland


Centre, and running parallel to the blood processing hall, services floor and top-floor testing and RD&I, is a space known as the


ADF APRIL 2017


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