search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
“I’M


NOT FIT ENOUGH”


This is not an excuse, it’s a reason to run. The beauty of running is that you can take it up regardless of the level of your fitness. Start slowly. If on your first day out you only make it to the end of the road and back then that is all you do. The next day you know to go that little but further. Building up your fitness is a slow process that takes time. Be patient. Don’t expect to be at marathon level after your first week. Breath and enjoy!


“IT


HURTS MY KNEES”


Often knee pain is the result of the knee cap being out of alignment. Strengthening the medial quadriceps muscles can be helpful in correcting this uneven pull by allow- ing the knee cap to track within its natural path. Also check your running shoes, how old are they, how many miles do they have, and are they the correct running shoe for you? Finally, possibly change or vary the type of running surface you are running on.


“I


ALWAYS GET A


STITCH”


Most scientists believe a stitch is caused by a reduction in blood supply to the diaphragm, causing it to cramp. Alternatively it may be caused by fluids which the body finds hard to digest. This causes the gut to “tug” on the liga- ments connecting it to the diaphragm. To avoid a stitch while running be mindful of what you eat prior to a run. Regulate your breathing and slow down, exhaling as the foot on the opposite side of the stitch strikes the ground. This actually works!


“I CAN’T GET MOTIVATED ”


Sometimes it can be very hard to get yourself motivated to go outside for a run – you are not alone there. One piece of advice I heard that I never forgot was a person who said “I have never gone on a run that I regretted!” Also maybe get yourself a running partner. If there are two of you it might be harder to talk yourselves out of a run!


Running is an activity that involves repetitive stress and impact, sometimes for a long duration. So this can cause back pain for people who have an underlying condition. Again checking your footwear is important to this one. Maybe you might need extra arch supports – speak to the experts. Our local sports stores will give you good ad- vice on all types of sport footwear. Warming up and cooling down before and after running is also vital, make sure you are doing this correctly. If the pain persists you may need to see a Chiropracter.


“I’M TOO BUSY”


We all lead busy lives, you just have to prioritise. Plan ahead and identify a morning/lunchbreak/eve- ning time that you can set aside for some exercise. Again having a running buddy could help here as you will need to co-ordi- nate a time to get out on the roads. Try and have a regular time and day that you get out and run and stick to that routine.


REASONS RUNNING IS GOOD FOR YOU


5


IT HELPS YOU SLEEP Runners tend to find it easier to fall asleep at night and sleep for longer than people who don’t pound the pavement.


“I HAVE BACK PAIN”


IT REDUCES STRESS Runners generally have less anxiety because exercise reduces the levels of cortisol (the stress hormone) in the body.


IT STRENGTHENS YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM Regular runners tend to get fewer colds partly because the cells in the body that fight off germs get stronger.


IT MAKES YOU HAPPY Going on regular runs can lift your spirits thanks to the release of mood- boosting endorphins. Running can even help relieve mild depression.


IT IMPROVES YOUR SKIN Running improves circulation and can help flush out toxins to keep skin clear and bright.


WATERFORD


25


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48