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88


DESIGN@LARGE


Sonic Youth


With representatives from 50 of the world’s top art and design programmes, The Global Grad Show exhibition is set to take Dubai Design Week by storm.


TEXT: JOANNE MOLINA


This year’s unprecedented Global Grad Show (24-29 October) will reveal how the next generation of designers is working faster than the speed of light. The largest-ever exhibition of student work from universities across the world, it will feature paradigm-shifting projects of designers from Peru to Singapore, as well as top talent from the MENA region. This second edition of the show will boast 135 projects from 50 leading universities in 30 countries and six continents, making it the world’s most diverse design education summit. Curated by Brendan McGetrick and taking place in Dubai’s d3, it will display mind-bending products that are poised to change the world.


LIGHTBOUND


Emilia Tapprest from Aalto University (Finland) has designed a device that enables two people to feel present with one another when physically apart. It features a pair of wifi-connected objects that send and receive ambient light. A real-time heartbeat creates a slight change of lighting in the environment with each pulse, and a touch translates into light in the remote location.


MIITO


Jasmina Grase from Design Academy Eindhoven (The Netherlands) has created a product that heats liquids directly in the vessel to be used, eliminating the heating of excess water. Fill a cup with water, place it onto the induction base and immerse the rod in the liquid. The induction base heats the rod, which then heats the liquid surrounding it.


ALGAE HARVESTER


Fredrik Ausinsch from the Umeå Institute of Design (Sweden) has created an algae-eating drone that cleans the water and powers itself with biofuel produced by the collected material. The algae sea collector was designed to improve an environmental problem by using the algae biomass as a future natural resource – turning the problem into an advantage.


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