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James formed way back in 1982, believe it or not. Since then they’ve created waves on the UK’s music scene. With massive 90’s anthems like Sit Down, Laid and Come Home, supporting huge names like The Smiths, New Order and David Bowie on tour, they’ve never really taken any time out to rest on their laurels. Their latest and 14th studio album Girls At The End Of The World came out in March and has been getting rave reviews. I asked Jim Glennie, bassist for the band, about Manchester, Alton Towers and why they chose to name the band after him.


Y


ou’re the band’s longest serving member- the


band’s been together for over 30 years now. How has your sound developed over that time? I suppose it’s massively developed from record to record. If you listen back to the early days of James those songs sound quite small and a little bit spindly – I don’t think we really knew what we were doing in the studio and we had a naïve approach to playing


10 / May 2016/outlineonline.co.uk


the songs. As you spend more time doing that you just develop a way of making the records sound different, more interesting, and you realise you can’t just play a song the way you might do live. You’ve got to deconstruct it and make it work in that environment. Yeah it’s changed massively; if you look at the records from the 90’s and the big anthemic sing-alongs, and then introducing technology, which was perhaps one of our


biggest shifts, right through to where we are now. Te last record we did, La Petite Mort, moved us on sonically. Te guy we worked with on it, Max Dingel, helped us to give a power to the record which we’ve struggled to do in the past. Live there’s a lot of power there but it’s difficult to translate that onto record. Max did a wonderful job, those songs sound huge, hence why we worked with him on our new album too.


So the band is named after you! How did that happen? It’s funny cos there wasn’t a huge debate on what we were going to call ourselves as no one knew who we were so it didn’t seem important. We wanted something that didn’t sound like a band, and we also didn’t want people to judge our music on the name of the band. We liked the idea of using someone’s name and also that the character of the band would be this person. We


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