This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Veterinary | TENGOAL


Uncannily, the clones seem to display the


personalities of the original mares. Copies of Dolfina Cuartetera, who is known for her sweet nature, have all been equally kind mares, even those born to roguish surrogates. Meanwhile the clones of Dolfina Lapa, a fierce mare notorious for her poor stable manners, are revealing that they too have a mean streak. Most intriguingly, one of the cloned animals, Mariano Aguirre’s gelding, Califa, has a phobia of garden hoses and so does his clone! Performance wise, the Crestview team


could not be happier with its track record. Some 85% of the clones that have already taken to the polo field are displaying either the same or greater level of ability than the original animal. As for the remaining 15%? Meeker rightly points out, if you’re a pony that’s just not quite as good as Cuartetera, you’re still likely to be better than 99% of the ponies playing today. Fascinatingly, there are some elements


of the operation that cannot, as yet, be explained by modern science. Most notable is the observation that cloned ponies seem to already know what to do before they begin their training. The American Owen Rinehart, a former 10-goaler who has been charged with the training of some of the clones, called Meeker to report on one Cuartetera copy. “There is nothing for me to do, I can’t teach this animal anything, she already knows everything!” he stated, before adding, “I’ll just keep her in shape and try not to screw it up!”


Statements like this, when considered


alongside reports of behavioural traits, such as unique phobias being passed to the clones, beg the question: is this evidence of cellular memory? A concept that has, to date, been impossible to prove. Cellular memory is the pseudoscientific


hypothesis that memories can be stored in individual cells. This, effectively, means that circumstances, preferences and emotions, among other experiential knowledge can be retained in the DNA and passed on. As the programme continues to evolve we can all eagerly watch this space for exciting developments in this field. Finally, when asked what he would


say to anyone who didn’t agree with the cloning of polo ponies Meeker’s response was simply: “Why?” If they are able to


respond with sensible reasoning, he will accept and respect the opinion of his opponents, before agreeing to disagree. He recalled and compared his situation to the London demonstrations in the late 1970s against the creation of “test-tube babies.” Protestors loudly disagreed with what has evolved into the modern and commonplace process of In-Vitro Fertilisation, claiming it to be morally suspect and against nature. Meeker is confident that cloning of polo ponies will, eventually, also be acceptable to the masses. “After all,” he said “clones are just twins separated by time, and the individuals are wonderful animals all deserving of the same respect that is afforded to all animals of planet Earth.”


79


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228