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Interiors | TENGOAL


TOUGH LOVE Of all the applications for leather in interiors, perhaps the most enduring is in furniture, an area where its many qualities come into their own. LINLEY is renowned for its upholstery and its Interior Design Director Tim Murray says, “It is an incredibly versatile material, although the correct selection of leather is very important, for example, beautiful saddle leather is not appropriate for soft upholstery.” The company’s Helix Sofa and Aston


Chair are two of its most well-known pieces, the latter being a testament to aniline leather’s ability to mould itself to the most extreme of shapes. Leather – real leather, that is – has


been described as “luxurious, decadent and unspeakably sexy”, so it’s no surprise that it is now taking hold in the bedroom and the almost infinite range of styles and colours these days caters from ultra- feminine to richly masculine. Specialists such as Bill Amberg and Alma Home offer an array of tanned hides in rich colours and varying textures.


Although regularly in demand, leather


beds and headboards are only part of the story – one of the most popular surfaces


to get the leather treatment


is the floor. This shouldn’t come as a surprise because apart from being warm underfoot, it is ultra


hard-wearing.


“Unlike other materials, leather wears in instead of wearing out,” says Saeed Khalique, CEO of Alma. “Frequent use brings out the natural patina of leather, which develops with age.” Leather’s latest bedfellow, room-wise,


is the home cinema or TV room. Because of its natural sound-insulating properties, it is increasingly the material of choice for lining walls of media rooms – an alliance with technology that demonstrates this amazing covering has come a long way


since its traditional association with the smoking lounges of gentlemen’s clubs. Bill Amberg has advice for those


pondering the on the choice of materials when considering a refurb: “A synthetic product


doesn’t have comparable


qualities: it won’t wear as well, it’s not necessarily fire resistant, it doesn’t have the tensile strength and it’s generally cold to the touch.” Another factor in its favour is its individuality – the cachet of bespoke leather furnishings at the high end lies in the rarity of some of the materials on offer. “For example, we use oak-bark-tanned leathers,” says Amberg. “Add to that choice, fish skin and ostrich leg and you are going to have a product that is both unique and beautiful – which is naturally reflected in the cost.”


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