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ROADMap TIPS FOR DRIVING CHANGE


BY BRIAN FIELKOW Guest Writer


The trucking industry is experiencing


a renaissance. Customers and key stake- holders recognize now more than ever our essential role in the economy. The acute and growing driver shortage will only con- tinue to magnify this. Regulatory hurdles continue to impact how we conduct our businesses. Customers are more focused than ever on performing due diligence on their trucking vendors to ensure proper safety scores and insurance companies. Technology is disrupting our industry in a very good way. As business leaders in this great


industry, we have a choice—to either change with the times or face extinction. It’s that simple. And, this has nothing to do with the size of your company. Small stature is an asset; small thinking is the kiss of death. That said, change can be freighting.


Will my employees adapt? I afford the cost of new technology? And the list goes on… When it comes to driving change in


your organization, there is always going to be resistance. Change is not always easily accepted by everyone. However, change should be seen as an opportunity for improvement, and as a leader, there are ways in which you can manage the change so that your team is best set up for success, understanding and acceptance. Here is what has worked for me as we have inte- grated process changes and new technology into our company.


56 Summer 2015 WHEN IT COMES TO CHANGE, KEEP IN MIND THE


20/60/20 RULE: 20 PERCENT OF YOUR TEAM WILL BE ON BOARD WITH THE CHANGE; 60 PERCENT WILL BE OPEN- MINDED; AND 20 PERCENT WILL IMMEDIATELY WRITE OFF THE CHANGE AND NOT WANT TO SUPPORT IT.


Take opinion leaders with you A leader cannot manage change all on


his/her own. You must have team members who support the change and can rally the troops. Enlist your opinion leaders to help communicate and lead the change. Considering your opinion leaders are often your front-line employees, they will be highly influential in helping to steer the change in a positive direction amongst your employees. In 2008, when we decided to install GPS in all of our trucks, it was a radical idea in our niche. So, we selected 20 drivers to operate with GPS for a few months as a beta group. We selected drivers who had the respect and credibility of their peers and drivers who we knew might be most likely to oppose the installation of GPS. After the trial period, these drivers reported saving a lot of time not having to prepare paper logs. They reported that their drive time actually increased because they had less paperwork. I would not have had the credibility to report these findings to our team compared to our opinion lead-


ers reporting these same findings. If you take your team with you, the fear of change will disappear.


The 20/60/20 rule When it comes to change, keep in


mind the 20/60/20 rule: 20 percent of your team will be on board with the change; 60 percent will be open-minded; and 20 per- cent will immediately write off the change and not want to support it. As a leader, your job is to appeal to the 80 percent who are on board or willing to be. The latter 20 percent may never support what you’re try- ing to do, and for those employees, try to win them over. If you can’t, ensure a smooth transition out of the company. When we put dash cams into our trucks, four of our drivers refused. They felt it was an invasion of their privacy, even though we could only see a few seconds before and after a trigger event. We tried everything, including an invitation to speak with the camera vendor to prove that we could not “invade their privacy,” even if we wanted


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