This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Natural Eye Care for Aging Dogs M


healthbriefs


any owners of middle-aged and older dogs worry about their pets’ declining eyesight. Cloudy eyes are of particular concern, but that is not necessarily a sign that a dog is going blind, advises Shawn Messon- nier, a doctor of veterinary medicine practicing in Plano, Texas. “While cataracts strike many older dogs, a more common condi- tion is lenticular or nuclear sclerosis, a thickening of the lens of the eye,” says Messonnier. He explains that this nor- mal change causes the eye to appear somewhat cloudy or gray, similar to a cataract. However, unlike a cataract, this type of sclerosis does not interfere with the pet’s vision. “Veterinarians can easily tell the difference between these conditions,” he says. “No treat- ment is necessary for lenticular scle- rosis; cataracts are often treated with carnosine drops or with surgery.” For prevention, Messonnier sug- gests minimizing toxins that can cause inflammation throughout an animal’s body, not just the eyes. This means using blood titer testing instead of an- nual vaccinations, reducing the use of flea and tick chemicals, using natural pet foods and minimizing the use of conventional medications.


He also recommends feeding a pet nutrients that contribute to health and reduce inflammation and cellular damage, including fish oil, probiotics and antioxidants like bilberry, which supports eye health.


Cavities are Contagious C


an a kiss lead to a cavity? Yes, says Middleton, Wis- consin, Dentist Chris Kammer, president of The Amer- ican Academy of Oral Systemic Health. He contends that cavities can be caused by bacteria that are passed from one person to another, just like a cold or the flu. “We aren’t born with tooth decay-causing bacteria,”


says Kammer. “At some point, it is introduced to us from an external source, usually a family member,” through


sharing food utensils, licking pacifiers, kissing and more. “Then it takes up residence in our mouths, where it is fed by sugars, which cause the bacteria to produce acid.” Cavity-causing bacteria can be transmitted by sharing food, by drinking out of the same glass and by toothbrushes that make contact with the bathroom counter. If bacteria is not removed from teeth (existing in a protective biofilm called plaque), the acid byproduct is able to directly reach and soften tooth surfaces, creating the holes called cavities.


Easy solutions to the problem start with good oral hygiene for both parents and kids and proper brushing from a very young age, starting with finger brushing as soon as the first tooth erupts. Kammer advises making it fun and thus habit-forming when kids become old enough to do it themselves; one new interactive toothbrush times kids to ensure they brush the dentist-recommended two minutes.


E


MERCURY RAISES RISK OF DIABETES AND HEART ATTACKS


xposure to mercury in young adulthood can trigger serious health issues later in life, according to two recent studies. New Indiana University research confirmed a link between mercury exposure and diabetes in young adults ages 20 to 32 at the beginning


of the study in 1987, and was periodically reassessed six times through 2005. Those with high mercury levels at the beginning of the study were 65 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as they aged. Also, Swedish researchers report that high mercury levels from eating con- taminated fish leads to a higher risk for heart attacks in men. However, eating clean coldwater fish high in healthy omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon, countered the increased risk from the mercury exposure, according to conclusions published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.


Nurture Your Business Secure this special ad placement!


Contact us for more information. 973-928-8884


10


Hudson County


NAHudson.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48