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TRADITIONAL Signage Individuality is appeal of Jason’s work


Jason Edwards, Proprietor of 5StarSigns, combines traditional metal working skills to hand build letters with modern methods and products such as LEDs to provide a specialist service to the sign trade. He has more than 20 years experience making signs


and set up 5StarSigns after relocating to Devon in 2007. Today he carries out a variety of built-up metal letter work, ranging from flat faced polished stainless steel to inverted or exverted polished bevels, chisel (prism) style letters, rim and return, and Zodiac style letter work. Working to the highest standards, he uses a variety of metals, including aluminium, polished stainless steel zintec, gold, and lead coat to provide one-off, hand made letters and logos. He has worked on prestigious projects demanding the utmost degree of fineness such as Euro Disney in Paris and the Bluewater Shopping Centre in Kent. “I learnt my skills from expert craftsmen who were


making bespoke signs by hand, at a time before lasers, routers and computers were widespread and this craftsmanship is reflected in my work today. My letter making skills gives signmakers the opportunity to offer something extra to their customers,” says Jason. “The advantage of hand building is that every letter is


Jason shaped these letters by hand to avoid damaging the special finish.


individual. You can produce a unique sign that you just can’t do mechanically, where you get one typeface only. Letters produced by computer are too standardised. Many worldwide companies like McDonalds use hand made signs.” A perfect example of Jason’s considerable skills and


experience was fabricating a stylish logo measuring almost two metres that tapered out to fine points at the ends, and needed to have halo illumination. Generally LEDs are put inside a letter or logo to


create the halo effect. But because of the shape of the logo, the LEDs wouldn’t have fitted inside the narrower part, which would have left almost a third of the logo unlit. Jason came up with a successful solution of


designing a back box with a water-jet cut out of the logo in an aluminium front panel backed up with Opal 050, and inserting LEDs in the cut out. The sign company


Jason did the work for powder coated the panel and he hand built the logo from de-scaled and mirror polished stainless steel. Then Jason fixed the logo 10mm off the front panel, enabling


Work in progress at FiveStarSigns.


the LEDs to create the required halo effect around the entire logo, including the fine end points. Finally, blue vinyl was applied to the face of the finished sign as per client instructions. His reputation for fabricating bespoke letters and


fitting LEDs was key to Jason working for another sign trade customer on a signage project at an exclusive new Indian restaurant. The restaurant wanted a one-off sign that would make their premises stand out from all the other eateries in the area and had chosen stainless steel lettering finished with gold embossing. Generally Jason cuts his letters by hand but on this


The finished logo. 82 Sign Update ISSUE 135 MARCH/APRIL 2012


occasion waterjet cutting was used before Jason carefully formed the letters by hand, to avoid damaging the gold embossing finish. LED lighting completed the effect. Find out more at www.5starsigns.co.uk or telephone Jason on 01803 296836.


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