This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TRADITIONAL Signage


Hand painting is the winning formula for Wayne


Wayne Osborne set up Osborne Signs in Midhurst, West Sussex, in 1994 to specialise in high quality and creative signwriting using traditional methods. The company’s work includes gold leaf, gilding,


glasswork, murals, pictorial signs and all types of handwritten signage including hanging, shop fascias, company vehicles, exterior lettering, and much more. Wayne makes his own signs and paints them by hand using traditional methods and his craftsmanship to produce a quality of finish and individual character that he believes is impossible to achieve with machine production methods.


Artists skills and a steady hand were both essential here. A proud Wayne with a finished piece of work. “My traditional hand painted signs are not only


functional in delivering their message but are also aesthetically pleasing, in design, colour and layout, and work visually with their surroundings. They work particularly well in locations that have retained their historical buildings and character and also in areas of conservation control,” says Wayne. While signwriting by hand may not be able to


compete with vinyl cut lettering or digital printing for speed, it remains a valuable and valid method to produce a unique one off sign, regardless of the surface to which it is painted or the intricacies of the design. In fact, on difficult surfaces, rough render or brickwork or upon historic buildings it can be the best and cheapest method to produce a sign. Far from being restricted by the design capabilities


Signwriting is a precise art that takes years to learn, says


Wayne, and even longer to master. It takes the hand and eye skill of painting letters with sable brushes, while at the same time conveying something very human into the job, which a computer doesn’t do.


of a computer, traditional signs are limited only by the imagination. Wayne’s customers tend to be small businesses and work often


comes via design agencies but recently he’s noticed a growing demand and has produced traditional style signage for a couple of restaurant chains as well. “It’s becoming more of a trend over the last couple of


years to have hand painted work, not just for signs but also as a feature inside, as for example used by a well-known pizza restaurant. I’ve just finished another job for an agency that works with the very fashionable brand, Gap. Skilful use of lettering and design in hand painted work shows that a company takes pride in their image and it is a cost-effective marketing tool,” explains Wayne. Unlike some areas of the sign trade where suppliers


are desperately undercutting each other on price just to get the work, traditional signwriting and gold leaf projects tend to attract realistic prices. Wayne says: “It takes years to get good at this type of


work; it’s not something you can just pick up. So fortunately, it’s more a case of getting paid what the work’s worth rather than having to undercut everyone else to the point where you can’t make a living.” The type of signage he enjoys doing most is “anything with pictorial work” or gold leaf. “I like people’s response when they see a sign or


Wayne’s hand painted lettering is just right for this vehicle. 78 Sign Update ISSUE 135 MARCH/APRIL 2012


gilding I’ve done. I enjoy getting ooohs and aaahs for my work, who wouldn’t?” he admits.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148