This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
HANGAR TALK


REBTECH Provides NVG Compatibility to the Virginia State Police Bell 407 Fleet


As the result of a competitive


bid award by the Virginia State Police Aviation Unit, REBTECH has teamed with Paradigm Aerospace Corporation (PAC) to provide the first night vision compatible cockpit and cabins for the agency’s Bell 407 helicopters. Installation of the REBTECH night vision Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) was completed at the PAC facility located in Mount Pleasant, PA. North Texas-based REBTECH is pro- viding the STC package as well as the night vision compatible instrumentation and avionics modification. The collaborative effort is the first both for REBTECH and PAC. “Paradigm was awarded the contract to provide the REBTECH NVG conversion and we have had a smooth and productive relationship with


ROTORCRAFTPROFESSIONAL


PAC. We appreciate both the confidence that PAC and the state of Virginia has in REBTECH, our products and support,” REBTECH presi- dent, Richard Borkowski com- mented. Formed in 1984, the


Virginia State Police Aviation Unit’s primary mission is to provide medical evacuation, search and rescue and law enforcement operations. The addition of night vision com- patibility provided by


REBTECH will improve safety and mission readiness for the department’s fleet of 407s. ◆


operators reduce costs, has introduced two new Federal Aviation Administration- approved components for Bell 206 helicopters. The Oil Cooler Blower and Pillow Block Assemblies and related Wear Disks are in stock and available now at a fraction of what the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) charges and provide equal or better form, fit, function and reliabil- ity. Able’s Oil Cooler Blower, for example, costs $1,636 less than the OEM version. “Savings of this magnitude add up quick- ly and are important to help hard-working operators stay profitable and competitive in a difficult market,” said Able Aerospace Services President and CEO Lee Benson. Oil Cooler Blowers and


related parts are critical to safe helicopter operations because they help protect engines and main transmissions from over- heating. The Pillow Block Assemblies —key main rotor hub components — were developed by Able in response to operator requests. Able’s Pillow Block Assemblies are priced 30 per- cent less than what the OEM charges.


Able Aerospace Services Introduces More Affordable Certified Components for Bell 206 Helicopters


Able Aerospace Services, on a mission to help helicopter


4


Able Aerospace Services offers a wide variety of approved replacement parts for the Bell 206 family of helicopters. The parts are certified by both the FAA and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). Bell 206 operators may also realize overhaul and repair savings ranging from 35 to 70 percent using the Able Preferred™ pro- gram. To learn more, visit www.ableaerospace.com. ◆


Airwolf Aerospace Offers STCd Rotor Blade Tape to Protect Against Delamination on Robinson Helicopters


Airwolf Aerospace LLC. is


marketing its FAA-certified (STC) blade tape kits as a pro- tective measure against blade skin delamination on Robinson R22 and R44 helicopter main rotor blades. The FAA recently issued a second Airworthiness Directive (AD 2011-12-10) on all Robinson helicopters.


In 2007, Robinson


Helicopter Co. issued service alerts SB-72 and SB-103 advis- ing owners that some main rotor blade skins were prone to debonding at the skin-to-spar joint on the lower surface of the blade tips, causing the aircraft to compromise its airworthi- ness. Debonding can occur when the bond line is exposed due to excessive erosion of the blade finish, or when corrosion occurs on the internal alumini- um tip cap. This most recent AD revisits a 2007 directive, which instructs Robinson R22 and


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52