This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ROTORCRAFT INTERNATIONAL


BY CATERINA HESSLER PHOTOS: CATERINA HESSLER


SWISS RESCUE


The Way of The Rega (Swiss Air-Rescue) is one of the most famous rescue


institutions in all of Europe. It has affected alpine rescue in Switzerland and worldwide. With over 13,700 missions in 2010 alone, the crews of the Rega are on call 24/7. Harsh terrain and the rapidly changing weather conditions present


a threat to hikers, climbers and everyone who enjoys outdoor recreation. Often people underestimate the forces of nature and get them-


selves into trouble. In case of an emergency a short and efficient res- cue system, a highly trained rescue crew and state of the art equipment are of utmost importance. The Rega sets the benchmarks for all those key features.


A Typical Day While two young friends were climbing in the riverbed of the


Verzasca River in Switzerland, neither of them thought they were in imminent danger. A short while later the calm river was turned into a torrent due to a thunderstorm in the Alps. Both men were able to climb on a rock in the middle of the water but could not return to the river- bank. A buddy discovered them in their hopeless situation and called the emergency service. Within minutes after the alert, a red and white helicopter, belonging to the famous Rega, arrived on scene. In cooper- ation with specialists of the Swiss Alpine Club (SAC), the crew was able to rescue the stranded men by hoist.


A Historical View Rega was founded in 1952. Since, they have had a remarkable


influence on mountain rescue. The first rescue missions were performed by parachutists who received their training and qualifications in the Royal Air Force of Great Britain. In December 1952, pilot Sepp Bauer successfully rescued a man with his Hiller 360. He fastened a regular balloon basket underneath the helicopter to get the injured person out


ROTORCRAFTPRO.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52