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ROTORCRAFT EMS


The AS365 Dauphin lifts off for an emergency EMS flight. OFFSHORE EMS European Style


BY CATERINA HESSLER, PHILIPP JAHNKE PHOTOS: CATERINA HESSLER


Due to environmental pollution and the


dawning end of mineral oil as one of the main energy resources, clean ways to generate renew- able energy gain more and more importance. One of the most important renewable energy sources is wind. Therefore giant wind farms are planned to be built in the Northern and Baltic Sea – but as the number and the size of those parks grow, new problems concerning the care for injured or ill workers arise.


ROTORCRAFTPROFESSIONAL It's my first visit to Emden, a small city at


Germany’s Northern seashore. The little airfield of the town is becoming more and more relevant for the offshore industry. It has been the hub of the airline OLT, which supplies the islands of East Frisia with food, goods and post, for years. But in the last years helicopter companies also settled here and are growing fast. One of those is Northern Helicopters, a company that is special- ized in Offshore-EMS flights.


20 It is about ten o’clock when the telephone


rings. Pilot Wolfgang Meinhard, called “Wolle,” informs the rest of the crew, “We have an alert, time to go flying.” The crews have to get airborne within twenty minutes after the alarm. This is just enough time to pull out the helicopter from the hangar, gather weather information, call the sec- ond paramedic (one is always at the base while the second one is in service and can be alerted any time), and climb into the helicopter.


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