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SUMMER LIFE


It is also a great opportunity to engage


with kids on a different level. Once you strip away the electronics and Internet and packed activity schedule, you’re left with only each other for entertainment. Our boat — a 35-foot Fantasia known as


Sea Bear — is family-friendly. With its various amenities, we call it our “floating cottage.” We stock it with craft supplies and Archie comics and games and cards, as well as more food than we think we’ll need because there is only one place in the East Arm where you can buy provisions. The small community of Lutsel K’e is a


blessing for sailors. It can take five to seven days or more to get from Yellowknife to Lutsel K’e under sail. In this picturesque community of about 300, you can buy goods in the small store or arrange to have things like food or spare parts shipped from Yellowknife. On one trip, we brought along my husband’s


(L-R) Dwayne Coad, mascot Jasmine, and Sea Bear crew, Danielle Patzer and Abigale Coad try to catch dinner.


daughter, Abigale, and her friend, Danielle, both age 11. We had no idea what to expect from growing appetites on a sailboat for 17 days. Food was stuffed in every available nook and cranny. We had an overflowing box of craft supplies so the girls could make scrapbooks of their trip; it held photo paper, albums, decorations, glue and more, plus unrelated miscellany such as craft clay and drawing supplies. We had cameras, a laptop,


This old boat lies forever silent in the calm of Moose Bay.


and a portable printer. The selection of electronics was something my husband and I spent some time discussing before the trip as we tried to figure out the right balance: both girls had never been on an extended sailing trip and we weren’t sure how they’d adjust to the slower pace. Each morning, we’d have breakfast — perhaps blueberry pancakes or fruit salad and cereal, at least until the fresh fruit ran out. We’d then clean up and carefully stow every- thing away – an absolute must on a sailboat. After making the boat shipshape, we’d hoist the anchor and set off for our next destination. While under way, our crew would


48


arcticjournal.ca


July/August 2011


© JAN FULLERTON (6)


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