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About the North


Gjoa Haven and Fort Simpson Pegged for Grass Roots Funding


With governments and financial institutions focused on major economic challenges, small, but worthy educational and cultural projects that would make a real difference to the lives of people at the community level never see the light of day due to a lack in funding. Under a unique national in scope concept


organized by the Small Change Fund and its partners, the Canada’s Seven Small Wonders Project, aims to micro-finance a broad range of community-specific projects across the country by involving the general public, the internet, and social media, to raise charitable contributions to fund local initiatives. In the North, several projects are already flying under the Seven Small Wonders Project banner and pegged to receive the support they need, including one in Fort Simpson, NWT, (River Journey: The Berger Inquiry Revisited) and a five-day Drum Dance Festival hosted by the Nunavut community of Gjoa Haven early this July. The Small Change Fund, with a host of national projects on the go already fully or partially funded, is all about the gift of people helping people. To find out how to give to the fund, or to suggest a project for your community, visit: www.smallchangefund.org.


Trio Awarded NorthWords Prize


Two well-known Northwest Territories writers, Pete Enzoe and Mindy Willet, along with fellow northerner, photographer, Tessa Macintosh, were awarded the 2011 NorthWords Prize for their collaborative book, The Caribou Feed Our Soul at the June 4 evening of the NorthWords Festival, De Beers Gala Readings. This, the sixth book in The Land is Our Storybook series,


(previously featured in above&beyond) sheds light on the intense spiritual relationship between the Chipewyan Dene and caribou both past and present and on the significant place caribou hold in the creation stories of their people.


July/August 2011


above & beyond


15


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