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Free Parking for


www.parcgroup.com ?


Handicapped PT spoke with the Chad Lynn, head of Parking for


Beverly Hills and President of the California Public Park- ingAssociation. The rules in California state that people with disabled


permits can park free on street. The disabled placard super- sedes all rates. This has a huge impact on parking inventory.We have a


large number of medical facilities in Beverly Hills. Natural- ly many people visiting them have disabled permits. Instead of parking in the reserved disabled spaces in the structures associated with these facilities, they park on street (because it is free) stressing our inventory. It is not unusual to find employees of these facilities have been issued disabled per- mits to park on street rather than pay the off street monthly parking charges. Enforcement is difficult.We have to take it all on face


value. Is the permit legitimate? Does it in fact belong to the driver, or to granny who passed away three years ago? Does the driver really need it (Doctors tell me that they have no real choice in issuing “notes” for permits. If they don’t the person will go to another doctor who will.) As the price of on street parking goes up, these permits


become a commodity.Will someone cheat to save 25 cents? Probably not.Will they cheat to save $5 or $10? Many will. As we bring the price of on street parking up to market rates, the problem will only get worse. The solution? Reform must come from the disabled


community. As disabled placards become more pervasive, there will be fewer and fewer spaces available for disabled parkers. Disabled parkers have toldme that they want access, a place to park where they can get their wheel chairs and crutches out and can get to their appointments and jobs. If we continue to provide “free” parking those with legitimate needs will not have spaces in which to park.


Parking Today


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FEBRUARY 2010 • PARKING TODAY • www.parkingtoday.com


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