This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
6. IDENTIFY ANY PRODUCTS THAT


SEEM TO BE BOUGHT FOR CONVENIENCE RATHER THAN THE BEST PRICE


8. TELL YOU WHERE YOUR STOCK IS


(CUPBOARD, FRIDGE, CELLAR)


10. HELP YOU


TO ACCURATELY COST EACH DISH YOU SERVE,


FOR ACCURATE PROFIT MARGIN ASSESSMENT


9. GIVE YOU AN 7. TELL YOU


IMMEDIATELY WHAT YOU HAVE IN STOCK


AND THEREFORE WHAT YOU NEED TO ORDER AND WHAT YOU MIGHT BE OVER-ORDERING


UP-TO-DATE STOCK


VALUATION, CRUCIAL FOR WORKING OUT GROSS PROFIT


In association with


How Fourth provided consolidation for CDG’s brands


A clear way in which specialist procurement can help restaurateurs is by consolidation, especially where a group in which individual restaurants did their own buying sets up organised group procurement. This is where Fourth


proved so valuable to Casual Dining Group (CDG), formerly Tragus, which owns a string of leading brands including Bella Italia, Café Rouge, La Tasca, Las Iguanas and Belgo. John Bradshaw, CDG’s head of commercial, said: “When we were Tragus we were a multiple-site group with no central directive, where different restaurants and different chefs were all doing their own thing.” When Fourth stepped in to help, CDG introduced the Starchef system, which offers a central database of ingredients so head chefs can see what is in the system and identify what they want.


www.thecaterer.com La Tasca


Development chefs can


also look into the system and it all feeds into a central stock control process that allows freedom but also has a “discipline and clarity”, which was not there before. Bradshaw says: “We had no central visibility of wastage or anything else. Once you get that visibility you can immediately identify any problems you might have.” Sometimes this can be something as simple as


buying food in smaller pack sizes to avoid wastage. Bradshaw says the


Fourth systems allow CDG to monitor compliance to recipes in different sites, accurately control stock and properly analyse the financial consequences of purchasing decisions. He adds: “It has enabled us to analyse our margins both overall and by brand and individual restaurants. It’s been a very important development for us.”


establishments. This is another advantage of computer programs – they can be adapted to suit all sorts of business. Hart says: “Fourth's solutions are suitable for all sizes of business, ranging from small or medium to more complex enterprise-type organisations. The solution is highly configu- rable and can be tailored to meet more basic operations or those than run multi-branded and global.” Hart believes that moving to a specialist procurement solution system is some- thing that most hospitality operators should embrace, but she adds that the adaptations needed can be challenging. She says: “It can be a major cultural change, particularly for a business which previously has not had sys- tems in place. They need to get used to doing things a little differently.”


And how should a hospitality company choose its procurement services provider? Hart advises operators to try and go for a pro- vider that makes hospitality its commercial bread and butter, rather than a general pro- curement company. Even this will leave you with a good num- ber of possibilities, so in the end the choice of procurement provider is probably as per- sonal as your taste in anything else. Even so, you should put them through a similar tender process to the one they will suggest for your food and drink suppliers. Look at what is out there, think about it, and make your choice. It could save you a lot of money.


Technology Prospectus 2017 | 41


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50