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Virginia CFO Awards


has annual revenue of $1.5 billion. With 11,700 employees, the health system is the largest private employer in western Virginia. Halliwill says Carilion works hard to


retain employees. “We’re trying to create a different environment, more free flow- ing [so] you don’t work in the same area for 10 years,” he says. For health care in general, Halliwill


Don Halliwill of Carilion Clinic says fi nding talent in a wide range of fi elds is getting more diffi cult.


believes the biggest challenge can be simply put: finding ways to spend less money while achieving better outcomes. He says physician leadership in health care is critical. “Administrators are not going to


solve the problems. Technology will not solve the problems. Clinicians and patients will solve the problems,” Hall- iwill emphasizes.


Health-care talent Don Halliwill, CFO of Roanoke-


based Carilion Clinic health system, says that finding talent — from clinicians to finance professionals and nearly every category in between — is getting more


Congratulations to


Hossein Sadid Nominated as Virginia’s Top CFO 2015 and 2016


For his excellence, integrity, and outstanding contributions as CFO of the Virginia Museum of


Fine Arts


difficult. People with high demand skills, he


says, are more mobile than ever. “People now feel comfortable going anywhere” at nearly any time, he says. Carilion, which operates eight nonprofit hospitals,


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200 N. Boulevard | www.VMFA.museum 72 AUGUST 2016


Revamping nonprofit While other CFOs


cite finding skilled workers as a one of their biggest challenges, Jim O’Brien says his major task was helping his small nonprofit organization revamp and stabilize. O’Brien, a retired Air Force colonel,


O’Brien


joined the 380,000-member Military Officers Association of America in 2010. The Alexandria-based association, he says, struggled after the recession, with volatile swings in its revenues. O’Brien — who credits a team


approach to problem solving — points to several changes that helped the organization. It created a subsidiary group, Voices


for American Troops, a social welfare organization. Open to people who did not qualify for association membership, the group assists in the association’s advocacy efforts. The association also works to


engage entry-level members, helping to reverse a long decline in overall member- ship. In addition, the nonprofit started the Military Family Initiative to generate support for the association’s philan- thropic endeavors focused on the general military community. “We created a culture of pursuing


ideas and opportunities and getting away from the spreadsheets,” O’Brien says.


Photo by Don Petersen


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