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commuters — from the West Coast. “People that understand Oracle


— cloud, software, hardware — those people are very difficult to find. We’re constantly running campaigns and finder’s fees. It’s one of the costs you have to bear,” Welborn says. When he joined Mythics in 2008, it


had annual revenue of $300 million, and eight people worked in the accounting department. Since then, revenue has tripled and the number of accounting employees has risen to 30. “You fasten your seat belt and hold on,” Welborn says of the company’s growth, which has been fueled by the federal government’s continued spending on IT.


Keeping a top rating Ellen McIlhenny, executive vice


president and CFO of Cobb Technolo- gies in Richmond, has helped guide the company’s expansion since joining it 17 years ago. Since 1998, Cobb’s annual revenue


has grown from $7 million to $25 million. McIlhenny says one of her chal-


workers. But the company also needs more truck drivers to deliver copiers and other office products. “We’re having more trouble finding people who want to come to work,” McIlhenny says. Mary Blowe, CFO


“We’re having more trouble fi nding people who want to come to work,” says Ellen McIlhenny of Cobb Technologies.


and director of support services for the city of Winchester, can relate to McIlhenny’s concerns. Blowe says she can’t always find enough qualified applicants for financial positions. “I don’t see young students coming into government,” she says. “The money isn’t there.” Blowe, however, has found a lot of


Blowe


lenges is helping the company to stay relevant in the fast-changing technology field.


Like other CFOs, McIlhenny also


says there are challenges in finding enough skilled personnel, specifically IT


Our CFO of the Year, every year.


Congratulations Sean Barden, for your 2016 CFO of the Year nomination in the Large Non-Profit category. We value all your efforts in the continuous improvement of Mary Washington Healthcare and your dedication to the health of the Fredericksburg region.


satisfaction in her work, presiding over two major upgrades to the city’s bond rating, which has a crucial impact on its cost of capital. During her tenure, Standard &


Poors raised the city’s bond rating from AA to AA+ in 2010 and raised it again in 2013 to AAA. Winchester is one of only 10 cities in Virginia with the AAA rating.


mwhc.com Photo by Rick DeBerry www.VirginiaBusiness.com VIRGINIA BUSINESS 71


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