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Cherry: I think the biggest challenges for us are not the software and hardware and security procedures that we put in place, it’s educational, both internally and externally. Internally, the biggest likelihood of entry into our system comes through email or internet. It’s an employee unknowingly or unwittingly clicking on a link or opening an email at- tachment … Externally, it’s the customers who don’t protect their systems that have to interact with us. T ey unwittingly open themselves up, and therefore gain an entry to us.


VB: What about with increased use of mobile apps by the customers? Does that open another door of vulnerabil- ity?


Cherry: It goes through the same kinds of protections. T e vulnerability usually there is … that customers don’t protect their information and leave it vulnerable. T at’s the greater likelihood. … So [it is not as likely that a hacker would gain access] into the entire bank from a mobile app, but it does obviously have vulnerability for customers.


Beale: You don’t want to be sitting in a coff ee shop with an unsecured, open Wi-Fi doing mobile banking. You’re probably putting yourself at way too much risk.


Shook: We went through an update recently on our mobile system to a more secure platform. You’ve got authentica- tion, dual authenticate, but nobody wants to add all that in. T ey want ease. T ey want to press the button and say, “Go,” and we’re trying to protect them in the process. You really want these multiple authentications so that someone can’t break into your system and thus into your fi nancial information. Ev- erybody wants the data, and everybody wants it in their handheld, but they’re not as focused on the security you really need to be thinking through when you use those devices.


Ridenour: One important aspect, I’m sure everyone would agree, is that regardless of how the breach occurs, the customer is going to look to the bank.


www.VirginiaBusiness.com


Even if they created the breach, they’re going to say, “Well, you know it was your system.” It is a public relations issue that we wrestle with every day.


VB: How has [the use of mobile apps] grown at your banks?


Aston: It’s defi nitely a growing part, I think, of every bank, every bank- ing business.


Cherry


things through the phone, we now can bank much more broadly then we were able to. I think for community banks especially, mobile bank- ing is going to be a hugely important part of their future. Today, on our consumer side, for example, not only can you get information, transfer money between accounts and make deposits by taking a picture, but you can also pay your bills by taking a picture of them, and you can


Cherry: We off er mobile banking ca- pabilities to both commercial customers and consumers, and it’s a hugely impor- tant part of community banking going forward because it allows us to play big- ger than our footprint. In the past, if you wanted to do business with people, you had to have an offi ce near them. Now, with remote capture and mobile banking, the ability to initiate and authenticate wires and transfers and those kinds of


turn your debit card on and off by just fl ipping a switch on your mobile bank- ing. I think that will be ubiquitous, and everyone will ultimately be doing that.


Still: I think mobile banking is very important, just like technology in general is so important for community banks. It’s allowed community banks to really leapfrog in the industry. It’s our fastest- growing section and millennials are fa- mous for wanting to use mobile banking. It’ll be a growing fi eld.


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www.PBMares.com VIRGINIA BUSINESS 29


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