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2014 OPTICS + PHOTONICS•


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Conferences & Courses: 17–21 August 2014 Exhibition: 19–21 August 2014


San Diego Convention Center San Diego, California, USA


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Ophir Pyro OEM Sensors – What options are available?


By Julian Marsden


Pyroelectric sensors have been used widely in the laser industry for many years to measure energy. They allow measurement of individual pulse energy or pulse-to-pulse variation for rapidly pulsing lasers, something that cannot be done with photodiode or thermal sensors. They also are not limited to visible or near- IR wavelengths like photodiodes, allowing measurements into the deep IR and THz regions. Ophir has recently introduced a new series of Pyroelectric OEM sensors based on the “PE-C” line of standard Pyroelectric sensors, which were introduced in 2011. This document presents the various options available to customers, lists the advantages of the new series over existing products, and mentions the capabilities of the new line.


By DILAS


Diode pumped alkali metal vapour lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality, making them an attractive candidate for future defence applications. A variety of gain media are used and each requires a different pump wavelength: near 852nm for caesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm.


The latest research in optical engineering and applications, nanotechnology, solar energy, and organic photonics


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Narrow line diode laser stacks for DPAL pumping


www.electrooptics.com/whitepapers


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