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Beauty - Eye Treatments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


The eyes have it


Everybody’s eyes have a different story to tell – whether it’s what they got up to the night before (bags anyone?) through to the tell-tale signs of ageing, such as Crow’s Feet and droopy lids, the eyes often reveal far more than we bargained for, so with this in mind how can you ensure that your client’s peepers send out the right message for them?


The first stage is to understand how and why the eyes are so vulnerable to daily assaults: “The skin around the eye area is thinner and more delicate than anywhere else. Continual free radical assault breaks down collagen and elastin fibres that help keep skin smooth and firm. Tissue in this delicate area also has fewer oil glands to help block penetration of topically-applied products or chemicals from the environment,” explains Sally Penford, Education Manager for Dermalogica UK and Ireland.


“Combine this with decades of squinting in the sun, late nights, lack of sleep and inadequate environmental protection and you have the tell-tale signs of eye area ageing,” she adds.


Turning back the clock


Of course, it’s all well and good acknowledging these issues once the damage has occurred but is it really possible to turn back the clock for our eyes?


“Whether the concern is lines and wrinkles, dark shadowing or puffiness, as the old saying goes prevention is better than cure. So like all good skin care habits, if clients start early with an eye treatment cream they can prevent premature deterioration of the vulnerable skin around the eye area. But even if they didn’t start early enough and panic is setting in, introducing an eye cream at any point into their routine will make a difference to the skin around the eyes,” Sally reassures us.


“Critical elements in your [clients’] daily routines [should] include cleansing, exfoliating, moisturising and SPF. Using a


moisturiser as an eye treatment is risky; some moisturising formulas can protect the skin around the eye orbit provided they are not too oil-rich or contain heavy mineral oils, as these will make eyes puffy.


“Over many years of regular use mineral- based and heavy oils from inappropriate products (like baby oil to remove eye make-up and petroleum jelly to protect) can accumulate in the tear ducts causing under eye bags. Some cases have shown that up to a teaspoon of oily product residue per eye has been removed during cosmetic surgery to correct severe eye bags.


“[Today], lighter weight eye formulas reduce this risk, and are generally more comfortable to wear. Your [clients’] moisturiser also needs to be artificial fragrance free with a balanced level of actives appropriate for this more sensitive and delicate tissue, to avoid developing dermatitis or suffering watery eyes,” Sally adds.


“[Furthermore], if your [clients’] daily moisturiser contains a built-in SPF you may also want to check whether chemical or physical sunscreens are being used in the formula; chemical sunscreens (including avobenzone, octinoxate, octisalate and oxybenzone) can sting and promote streaming eyes, particularly if your clients already have genetically sensitive skin or are prone to hayfever and allergies.


“Eye creams, gels and serums, on the other hand, are carefully formulated to protect and treat in a suitable weight product,” advises Sally. “Active ingredients like vitamins (including highly active retinoids), botanicals, peptides and SPF’s (physical sunscreens such as Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide) are sympathetically selected to minimise sensitivity potential.”


Turn the page to see a selection of some of the latest eye treatment products to hit the market…


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