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TOOLS OF THE TRADE Figure 9-1 Goals and Performance Areas With Sample Scores*


*Measures and scores for each performance area are displayed when the + sign to the left is clicked. Source: www.tbltool.org


as details for each measure, including why it was chosen, alternatives considered and potential caveats.8 The Data Document is an input worksheet for collecting the information needed to run a project through the tool.9 Also, the scoring framework in the Data Document permits users to see how their scores may be improved. The TBL Tool meets the need for a common


sustainability framework for economic development investment in a way that is compatible with existing frameworks that serve related but distinct domains (e.g., GIIRS for companies, LEED-ND for neighborhood developments, Envision for infrastructure). The current version of the tool applies to the United States due to the data sets used for scoring; the framework may be modified to other settings in the future. Also, the beta version of the TBL Tool provides scores for place-based economic development investments; a future version is expected to score programs (e.g., a citywide weatherization or business development program).


Relevance of the TBL Tool to the Shopping-Center Industry Shopping centers have long been a hub of community


life and contributor to economic development, evolving in response to changes in consumer demand, technology, policy and pricing. Recently, these drivers have placed the issue of sustainability on the industry’s agenda. Shopping centers are working to retain customers in the presence of increased competition from online alternatives; respond to sustainability imperatives by investors, consumers and decision-makers; and manage costs and climate impact through green design and operations. Examples of this emerging sustainability agenda include


the development of the Property Efficiency Scorecard by ICSC, the release of a volume devoted to sustainable retail development,10 the presence of a Special Industry Group for Sustainability within ICSC, sustainability reporting by the Retail Industry Leaders Association,11 and increased attention to corporate social responsibility by developers and owners of shopping centers.12


8 http://www.tbltool.org/files/TBL%20Tool%20User%27s%20Guide.pdf 9 http://tbltool.org/files/project_information.pdf 10 Jerry Yudelson, Sustainable Retail Development: New Success Strategies. Springer, New York, 2009. 11 2013 Retail Sustainability Report: Fueling Continuous Development. Retail Industry Leaders Association, 2013, retrieved April 10, 2013. 12 Idalina Dias Sardinha, Lucas Reijnders, and Paula Antunes, “Using Corporate Social Responsibility Benchmarking Framework to Identify and


Assess Corporate Social Responsibility Trends of Real Estate Companies Owning and Developing Shopping Centres,” Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 19 (No. 13), 2011, pp. 1486-1493.


INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF SHOPPING CENTERS 45 3 RETAIL PROPERTY INSIGHTS VOL. 20, NO.2, 2013


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