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PERMANENT WAY & INFRASTRUCTURE


Automatic fire suppression


Tim Melton of F Firetrace explains the advantages of automatic fire suppression systems for the rail industry.


ires in anything from signalling equipment to plant


and vehicles can be very costly for operators and can cause costly delays.


Traditional fire protection systems could be complex and very expensive – until now. Firetrace has developed a range of automatic fire suppression systems ideal for protecting all types of rail applications.


The systems use our unique linear detection tubing, which is installed throughout the risk area. This tubing can not only quickly and accurately detect a fire but extinguish it before it can damage adjacent equipment. The systems do not need complex electronic detectors or panels and operate simply using pneumatics. This makes it ideal for remote or unmanned areas or equipment such as signal boxes, generators, mobile plant and rail vehicles.


All Firetrace systems are CE marked and manufactured under our ISO 9001:2008 quality system.


They are also compliant with the railway standards and have previously been accepted for use on a number of rail projects: side tipping ballast wagons; auto ballasters; sandite modules and railhead treatment trains (RHTT); infrastructure


monitoring


vehicles; long welded rail vehicles; EMU Translator vehicles; and many more.


Firetrace has been manufacturing suppression systems for over 20 years and has a number of documented success stories where the systems have both detected and extinguished fires with little or no damage to the equipment.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01473 744090 E: info@firetrace.co.uk W: www.firetrace.co.uk


The market leader in cable protection systems


Sean Forrester of Anderton Concrete explains how its products can help tackle the rail industry efficiency agenda. W


ith the recent announcement by the Office of Rail Regulation that over


£2bn of savings have been identified in plans that will enable Britain’s railways to achieve growth and increased capacity, it is paramount that Network Rail seeks input from all its stakeholders to demonstrate that these plans address the needs of the end user.


Part of the response to these challenges has been to evolve Network Rail into a more accountable, open and innovative organisation.


Anderton Concrete is the market leader in the supply of cable protection systems to the UK rail industry, along with complementary products and a wide range of civil engineering


material offering significant cost savings and improvements in installation efficiency.


While the company’s civil engineering product range is relatively new under the Anderton Concrete brand, these products have been in circulation for a significant length of time through an umbrella company within the group. This in turn has opened up additional opportunities for their use, especially when considering viable cost effective alternatives.


Stepoc is a well-established, direct substitute to shuttered concrete offering speed of construction, the use of semi-skilled labour and strength. It is an accepted system for flood protection, retaining walls, platform edges


and blast panels. Slope-loc is another dry laid concrete block system that offers an aesthetic finish while providing a structural solution for reinforced slopes and embankments; it is maintenance free and easy to install.


Anderton Concrete has full Network Rail approval status and Link-Up accreditation for its full range of C1 troughing products. Our range of civil engineering products are all manufactured to harmonised European standards, meet the Construction Products Regulations (CE Marking) and fall under the company’s established ISO 9001 framework. FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01606 79436/535300 W: www.andertonconcrete.co.uk


rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 13 | 59


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