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TRAINING, JOBS AND SKILLS


Are you ready for the changes? T


Judith Devlin of TRAC Training explains the coming changes to the rules on training and competencies.


here are going to be some pretty big changes affecting us all in the coming months and TRAC Training are here to help.


As a licensed NSARE training provider in Track Safety, On Track Plant, Machine/Crane Controller & Lift Planner we would like to let you know about a couple you may not have heard much about.


Lift Planning Machine/Crane Controllers & Operators


As of 1 January 2014, any organisation involved in OTP Lift Planning must have in place personnel who hold the new Sentinel OTP Single Lift / Tandem Lift planning competence in order to produce and sign off lift plans.


Those who are currently competent in Lift Planning are required to carry out a formal assessment no later than 1 January 2014.


Network Rail and a rail industry collaborative working group (including one of our own trainers) have reviewed and updated all training and assessment materials, competencies and hierarchy arrangements for the above competencies.


All competencies in OTP and OTM for


This has led to the length of time a competence is held and the method of re-assessment varying in line with the specific machine and attachment grouping and the associated risks with competence validity varying from three to five years.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01698 748700 E: training@trac.com


If successful in passing this assessment, the individual will be awarded the OTP Lift Planning Sentinel competence for three years and will be able to undertake OTP Lift Planning duties.


Those who are unsuccessful will have the competence withdrawn and will be required to address any shortfall areas or attend initial training.


Operators and Controllers have gone through a risk-based assurance analysis.


Highly skilled technical training A


AmberTrain director Martyn Butler explains the courses and training it offers.


mberTrain provides a vital link between the rail industry and skilled resource by


offering fully funded training for 17 to 24-year- olds from various sites across the UK. Our courses are designed around getting started


railway, but supports them whilst they progress within the industry.


Alongside vocational training, AmberTrain can deliver a wide variety of training qualifications, including PTS, DCCR and TIC on a commercial basis, along with Small Plant Training, IOSH Working Safely and IOSH Managing Safely. Should you have a request for training that does not appear on our standard portfolio we will work with you to design a bespoke delivery training course that meets your specific needs, some of which can be fully funded for existing staff – with no limit on age.


Trainers and assessors are highly skilled in technical teaching, training and the rail


within the industry, from work tasters right through to Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeships, offering the best possible mixture of real world learning in a safe controlled environment.


Our programme not only teaches the candidate skills, knowledge and understanding of the


28 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 13


industry as a whole. With expertise, they are able to draw on this to constantly strive to deliver the highest possible quality of training.


We have a dedicated team with a wealth of knowledge and experience, from trainers with nearly 30 years’ experience of permanent


way activities to management, quality and contractual compliance carried out by experienced staff – all of whom have experience delivering various college programmes that enable employers to access cost-effective training for new and existing staff.


FOR MORE INFORMATION


T: 01777 816804 E: information@ambertrain.co.uk W: www.ambertrain.co.uk


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