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ROLLING STOCK


Draper continued: “It’s great in a way that there isn’t an aeroplane [in the hangar] today, because if there was, people might be focusing on that rather than the processes. It’s all about learning from other industries.”


The ReFocus group has been on a number of visits now, including to Welsh Water, Nissan and others, as well as some within the rail industry.


20 Point Plan Industry similarities


The first iteration of ATOC’s 20 Point Plan for maximising the reliability of rolling stock – the current version of which can be found in the ‘National Fleet Reliability Improvement Programme’


document – was written by


BMT Reliability Consultants, which was instrumental in organising the Monarch visit.


Its senior consultant, dedicated to the rail sector, Mick Connor, said: “We wrote its first iteration, then it became ATOC’s document and they moved it on. We wrote that based on best practice from other industries – the majority of it from aerospace and defence.


“We started in rail in 1998, and ever since we’ve been trying to bring best practice into the rail industry from other industries, since we work in defence, oil & gas, civil aviation, maritime shipping.


36 | rail technology magazine Aug/Sep 13


He and Draper both noted how many similarities there are between aircraft engineering and rail engineering, and said the amount of engagement from the ATOC visitors on the day showed how worthwhile it was.


Derek Jackson from ATOC ReFocus added: “It backs up the principle that engineering is engineering is engineering.”


Draper said: “The air engineering side suffers from exactly the same issues as the rail side. The classic ones are supply management; delay management; configuration control.


“Aircraft engineers have got it sorted, because they have a very structured design authority approach. Unfortunately, the rail industry doesn’t have that: you had British Rail, which


Draper said: “In rail, that’s still supposed to be there – but it gets short-cutted.”


He added: “They [the aviation industry] have learnt from rail, too. Competency management is just coming in, in the aviation industry. I was gobsmacked when I heard that, I thought they would have it tied up.”


Some of the topics discussed


• Maintenance planning and at what periodicity


• Configuration and modification control • Managing differed work and how it impacts on availability


• Control of maintenance at satellite facilities


• Management of the supply chain • Modern maintenance techniques


“It is all about the holistic approach: if you put a different bogie on a train, it doesn’t mean that’s the only thing you’ve got to do.


“You’ve got to train people, change your facilities, and things like that. ATOC have grown it in into a very interesting document.”


BMT organised a trip to Monarch’s facility at Luton about four years ago, Connor said, adding: “That went down very well.”


built all the trains and that was that. But now people don’t always know who’s responsible for what.”


Connor said: “If you want to put a poster on a wall on a bulkhead in an aeroplane, you’ve got to get the owner’s permission.


“So Boeing are the design authority for all Boeing aircraft around the world. If you want to do anything, it’s got to go up that tree and come back down again.”


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