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Out and About KSLD


Iona Abbey Museum Iona, Scotland


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Light at the Museum


Kevan Shaw Lighting Design (KSLD) has just completed the lighting design, installation and focussing for the new exhibition at The Iona Abbey Museum, which opened to the public June 1st 2013.


The Iona Abbey Museum is owned and operated by Historic Scotland. It houses a unique collection of dark age and medieval high stone crosses, grave slabs and grave markers which relate to the island and its influences on the west coast of Scotland during the early centuries of medieval Christianity after its foundation by St Columba in the 6th Century. The lighting has just been completed by Kevan Shaw Lighting Design (KSLD) for the opening to the public on 1st June 2013. The brief was to design a lighting scheme that would bring out the texture and carving work of the stones, so many of which had badly eroded after being exposed for centuries. Working closely with HS interpretation unit and exhibition designers, KSLD were able to ensure that the display of individual stone and location of lighting equipment were best placed to deliver the exhibition lighting qualities


required and KSLD used only LED light sources which reduced energy and maintenance costs. Lighting Designer, Martin Granese says: "As our first all-LED exhibition lighting scheme, it has been a real challenge to ensure that we get the lighting quality and flexibility demanded by such installations. We have worked hard with the rest of the design team and luminaire manufacturers to ensure that the scheme meets all expectations. There has been a real maturation of LED over the last two/three years and it's exciting to be able to be at the forefront of this technology cross-over."


Contact


Kevan Shaw Lighting Design T: +44 (0) 131 555 5553 W: www.ksld.com


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www.a1lightingmagazine.com


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