This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
A radiosonde launch in Maldives to study the initiation phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation.


Basic Overview


GAUS is a balloon-borne rawinsonde sounding system that can be deployed around the world, making high-resolution soundings of temperature, humidity, pressure, and winds using GPS radio- sondes. Each system includes a meteorological observing station to record thermodynamic data at the surface and the infrastructure to provide local data processing, display, and communications. Data from GAUS can be transferred by phone, the Internet or the Global Telecommunication Sys- tem (GTS) to scientists at universities, other research institutions, and operational weather cen- ters. The Mobile GAUS (MGAUS) is used by scientists to investigate rapidly moving or targeted phenomena, and also for education and outreach activities such as school visits. GAUS is an in- tegral part of the ISS and they are often deployed together.


Radiosonde Specifications Manufacturer type


Ascent rate Pressure sensor


Temperature sensor Humidity sensor


Contact


Vaisala RS92-SGP 4 m/s (average)


BAROCAP capacitive aneroid THERMOCAP capacitive wire HUMICAP thin film capacitor


Typical Research Applications


The GAUS system allows researchers to supplement operational soundings by placing sounding systems in essential locations and by launching sondes at higher or variable frequencies. GAUS balloons have been sent into extreme weather situations to take measurements that would other- wise be unattainable. For example, GAUS has been used to study tornadic storms, and in winter cyclones to examine the wind fronts and precipitation bands surrounding the storms. GAUS is also an attractive facility for educational projects.


ISF Manager Dr. Stephen Cohn cohn@ucar.edu 303.497.8826


Lead Scientist Dr. William Brown wbrown@ucar.edu 303.497.8774


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147